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Sajan

Agent None's page

Pathfinder Society Member. 18 posts. No reviews. No lists. No wishlists.


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Liberty's Edge

1 person marked this as a favorite.

Holy crap that was it. Had to google the name and look at a few images to find the map but that was the one. Thank you ever so much. Been looking for almost a week now. Very much appreciated.

Liberty's Edge

I've tried my google-fu on this and came up empty handed. I ran this adventure about 4 years ago or so with my old group. I've since moved and will be starting a new campaign with a new group and would like to use this same adventure as a starting point to the campaign. Thing is, I cannot for the life of me remember the name of the adventure. I've gone through wikis and even googled different aspects of it with no such luck. So now I turn to you folks in hopes someone recognizes the adventure I'm having trouble finding. We didn't get too far into it so I only have limited details, but I hope it's enough to go on. Anyway, the details:

The characters arrive at some fort/keep/somesuch that has its entrance guarded by a few orcs. Some are inside the building that shoot arrows at the PCs through arrow slots in the walls. Further in is a large door that houses an ogre with two wolves. This encounter is almost a BBEG battle in itself. Further along are a series of troglodyte rangers (?) armed with javelins/spears, that once battle starts one tries to pull a lever to release a bear from a cage to help them out.

That's all I remember and as far as we got as that battle with the trogs/bear was a TPK. If anyone recognizes this adventure/module I'd be greatly appreciative.

Liberty's Edge

MassivePauldrons wrote:
Why would the type of action need to be specified for Phalanx Soldier? The type of action is already explicit in the rules for Fighting Defensively/Total Defense, seems unnecessary to me.

And that's what I thought too. Oh well, I've removed it fom my update.

Liberty's Edge

Here's the edits based on the suggestions given by some already. Plus, one that I forgot to put in my original post and since you can't edit posts I figured I'd post it now that I'm also posting the "updates." It's the bottom one.

Phalanx Soldier (Kondul): The nation's required training in the Kondulan Phalanx has taught you a great deal of combat with a shield, instilling the ideal that a good defense is the best offense. When using a shield and using the Fighting Defensively or Total Defense option you gain a +2 trait bonus to your CMD against Trip, Bull Rush and Disarm attempts targeting your shield. This bonus lasts until the start of your next turn.

Martial Observer (Sargon): Growing up in the city has given you easy access to the martial arts tournaments held every year. After watching these tournaments and returning home, you would emulate the fighters in your room, away from prying eyes. This was the closest you were ever able to becoming a member of one of the various monk training academies. You gain a +1 trait bonus to damage rolls when fighting unarmed.

Hot Blooded (Falken): Living in a desert society is rough, especially for those merely visiting. But, as a native, your body has accustomed to the constant heat and cloudless skies. You gain a +2 trait bonus to Fortitude saving throws versus Fatigue and Exhaustion spells and effects. In addition, you gain this bonus to Fortitude checks when staving off the effects of hot weather exposure.

Cold Blooded (Harglen): A harsh environment in a tough civilization has given you the ability to withstand the unforgiving rigors of the northern tundra's winter-like climate. You gain a +2 trait bonus to saving throws versus cold and ice based spells and effects. In addition, you gain this bonus to Fortitude checks when staving off the effects of cold weather exposure.

Distant Shot (Vel D’Larna): Life in the elven lands was fairly simple and relaxed. You weren’t rushed into any training and were given ample time to learn to use a bow. When using a longbow or shortbow (not including composites or any other bow-like weapon) increase your range increment by +10 feet. This is a trait bonus.

Liberty's Edge

Dragonamedrake wrote:
boring7 wrote:

Possible issues:

Noble Rouser: that's a lot of money, relatively speaking. I think it might be too much.

There are several traits that give as much or more gold. Rich Parents for instance give you 900 extra starting gold.

Having said that. None of these seem overpowered. Several are actually pretty weak compared to existing traits, but that's not necessarily a bad thing. Just pointing it out.

I liked the Rich Parents trait. But at the same time, it doesn't do much for the long-haul of a campaign. So I tried to make one that helped starting characters out a little based off that trait, as well as give them a minor bonus to something else they can use for the life of the character.

As for the weak ones, could you point them out? I'm trying to make them as balanced as I can.

Liberty's Edge

boring7 wrote:
Martial observer: Not sure how useful that one is.

Bar brawls happen in my campaigns a lot for some reason. And as a result, fists and feet are all over the place, and it very rarely involves lethal damage. So in a sense, it works. I took the idea from Bulletproof Monk. Dude learns martial arts from watching old kung-fu movies, but he's far from actually trained.

boring7 wrote:
Bestial Resistance: this may seem petty, but my own sensibilities are offended by the use of Lamarckian genetics and would alter the fluff text for why it works the way it does.

I agree, the fluff could be altered slightly, but at the same time, this is a world where werewolves exist. So scientific theory/fact/whathaveyou doesn't necessarily have to apply as far as "genetic reasoning" goes.

Liberty's Edge

1 person marked this as a favorite.

I'm posting these here so I can get some feedback on them, as well as maybe some balance issues tweaked. I'm horrible when it comes to balancing things at times. But, at the same time, I kind of like the flavor of these so I figured I'd also share them with my fellow gamers. Enjoy. And thanks in advance. Also, please keep in mind that these traits are for my own custom homebrew campaign, hence the rather specific nature of some of them.

These traits are all considered regional, in that the character that wishes to take one must hail from that nation, either having lived there since birth and recently left to join in the campaign, or have lived there for an extended period of time prior to becoming a first level character, generally 3 years. These traits follow the same trait rules, in that their bonuses do not stack with bonuses provided by a different trait to the same thing, and only one of these can be chosen by the character. The region is given in parentheses after the trait name.

Noble-Rouser (Baronlands): While not born into nobility, you did manage to befried the child of a notable family. As such, you've managed to increase your standing and station, by a small degree, with that family. As a token of friendship, your friend has decided to aid you, and help fund your choice to become an adventurer. Your starting cash increases to 450 gold. In addition, you gain a +1 trait bonus to Knowledge (Nobility), and Knowledge (Nobility) is always a class skill for you.

Poisonbane (Black Meadows): Constant encounters with the resident lizardfolk, and their choice tactics, has enabled you to better resist their debilitating toxins better than most. You gain a +2 trait bonus to Fortitude saves to resist the effects of poisons.

Skullduggery (Crimson Coast): Verbal trickery, bribery and under-handed tactics are second nature to a native of the Crimson Coast's lawless nature. You gain a +1 trait bonus to Bluff and Sleight of Hand check, and one of these skills (your choice) is always a class skill for you.

Hot Blooded (Falken): Living in a desert society is rough, especially for those merely visiting. But, as a native, your body has accustomed to the constant heat and cloudless skies. You gain a +2 trait bonus to Fortitude saving throws versus Fatigue and Exhaustion effects. In addition, you gain this bonus to Fortitude checks when staving off the effects of hot weather exposure, and reduce the non-lethal damage taken from exposure from 1d4 to 1d3.

Flower Child (Fuldara): Repeated exposure to plant and animal life through everyday encounters with nomadic druids throughout your life has taught you a few things. You gain a +1 trait bonus to Handle Animal and Knowledge (Nature) checks, and one of these skills (your choice) is always a class skill for you.

Cold Blooded (Harglen): A harsh environment in a tough civilization has given you the ability to withstand the unforgiving rigors of the northern tundra's winter-like climate. You gain a +2 trait bonus to saving throws versus cold and ice based spells. In addition, you gain this bonus to Fortitude checks when staving off the effects of cold weather exposure, and reduce the non-lethal damage taken when exposed from 1d6 to 1d4.

Kingsman (Kaldor'Ak Kingdom): Commerce and trade have been a staple in your everyday life living in the kingdom. You gain a +1 trait bonus to Appraise and Diplomacy checks, and one of these skills (your choice) is always a class skill for you.

Phalanx Solider (Kondul): The nation's required training in the Kondulian Phalanx has taught you a great deal of combat with a shield, instilling the ideal that a good defense is the best offense. When employing a heavy or tower shield and using the Fighting Defensively or Total Defense options, you gain a +2 trait bous to your CMD against Trip, Bull Rush and Disarm attempts targeting your shield. This bonus lasts until the start of your next turn.

Alcoholic (Lachlan): At a young age you'd always sneak a sip or two from your parents' liquor cabinet. Now, as an adult, it has helped you greatly in local drinking contests at the nearby tavern. You gain a +2 trait bonus to Fortitude checks when resisting the effects of, and addiction to, alcohol. In addition, if you do get addicted to alcohol, the penalties for these addictions are halved.

Stonefear (Medusa's Hold): Living in a nation ruled by a collective of medusae has had a resounding paranoia on the community as a whole. As such, many folks have found secret ways to enable their bodies to withstand their gaze, should they ever be unfortunate enough to meet one. You gain a +2 trait bonus to saving throws to resist being turned to stone and a +10% increase to the chance to avoid having to make a saving throw against gaze attacks when averting your eyes.

Undeath Exposure (Restmoore): Living in a gloomy and swampy region has allowed you the opportunity to experience a plethora of undead from a very early age. As such, you've learned how to combat their methods. You gain a +1 trait bonus on all critical hit confirmation rolls against undead and you gain a +2 trait bonus to Fortitude saving throws to stave off the effects of energy drain when employed by an undead.

Martial Observer (Sargon): Growing up in the city has given you easy access to the martial arts tournaments held every year. After watching these tournaments and returning home, you would emulate the fighters in your room, away from prying eyes. This was the closest you were ever able to becoming a member of one of the various monk training academies. You gain a +1 trait bonus to hit and damage rolls when fighting with unarmed strikes, so long as you do not possess the Improved Unarmed Combat feat.

Bestial Resistance (Savage Wilds): Growing up, and surviving, in the savage wild lands is a feat all of its own. The lands are constantly being plagued by the lycanthropic beasts. As a result, your body has learned to adjust to this overwhelming threat. You gain a +2 trait bonus to Fortitude saves to resist contracting the Curse of Lcanthrope. In addition, if you do contract the curse, you gain a +2 trait bonus to your Willpower saving throw to become aware of your condition.

Liberty's Edge

Speaking of equipment, how do you handle that? It says that the characters are expected to travel light and will be given a few items before they take off. How does this translate into starting funds for the character? I originally planned on just using the class average for starting gold, but should I reduce this amount since they're getting a bunch of stuff? Or just to tell them to use it to buy weapons, armor and other class-related stuff and keep the rest of the gold?

Liberty's Edge

Ajaxis wrote:

1. Put a key on the opposite side of the pit, or just greatly lower the DC of the lock.

2. The stairs are supposed to meet up.

Both were oversights.

Attribution: Both corrections taken from episode one of the Pathfinder Chronicles Podcast.

Awesome. That cleans up the stairs nicely. But what's this about a key needing to be placed? The only pit I know about is the one in the

Spoiler:
Pillar of 1,000 Arrows room, and the door that's locked to the south opens when the trap gets done doing its thing.

Edit: Scratch all that stuff about the key. Just read it on the link Steve posted. I didn't even notice the door on the map. lol I'll just remove the door and call it good.

Liberty's Edge

I Googled this module myself as I'm preparing to run it as well. And found this thread. Nice to see that it's not like 2 years old or anything.

I have a question about the map. Room 9 (Wood Golem) and Room 4 (Bombardier Beetle) have a set of stairs going to the middle of the map but stop 5 feet short. The room descriptions don't mention these stairs and the 2nd floor map shows no sign of connecting anywhere to them. Is this just a map mistake or am I missing the description for where they lead somewhere else?

Liberty's Edge

Mojorat wrote:

There are not alot of these linked module chains. The only other one i can think of is the D0 d1 d1.5 and d5. Which if you start a new campaign i recomend.

But using that chain above theres several other modules in the same area that you can easily add or move to etc.

Anyhow i would look for modules in the same area as the ones you are doing. (though i dont have those three so i dont actually know where that is, my group the Dm disappeared for six month half way through crypt and we never finished it)

Well looking at them it looks like it takes place in Cheliax. Tho I'm not for certain as it's been quite a few hours and I'm not near my books at the moment.

Liberty's Edge

Ok, well that does kind of suck. But at the same time, I love it when three random modules can be linked together like that. I think I found a few others, with the last one requiring them to be 17th level to start. Thanks anyway tho.

Oh, and sorry for putting this in the wrong area. Still kinda new to the boards of this place and the interface can be a little tricky if you don't know what you're doing.

Liberty's Edge

So I'm trying to get a new Pathfinder campaign set up for my group and while I like the adventure paths I've looked at, most of my players have looked at them too. So I'm wanting to do something a little different, I just need a little help and guidance. I bought Masks of the Living God from Amazon and saw that it follows Crypt of the Everflame. After doing some Google-Fu, it looks like City of Golden Death follows the Masks module. Everflame starts at level one, and looks like it takes characters to level 3. Masks takes them from level 3 to what looks like level 5. And City of Golden Death starts them at level 5 as well as references some NPCs from the previous two modules. Does anyone know what other modules are in this "chain" and how high level it takes the character level? Nothing I've looked at so far has given me much information. Any and all help would be much appreciated. And I don't want to deviate from this chain as both Everflame and Masks are a great read and would provide an excellent and fun, and unexpected, challenge for my players. I'm waiting on my Golden Death book to arrive and would like to know what modules come next so I can get them on their way as well. Thanks in advance folks. Happy gaming.

-Agent

Liberty's Edge

That makes critical hits a little ovepowered then. Could be instant character death at low levels. Guess we all read the 3.5 version of it wrong. We thought it was roll the damage dice a number of times equal to the critical hit multiplier, then add in all bonuses from Strength and other sources onto the die roll total.

Liberty's Edge

So this last game session in my group, a player in our group had been doing critical hits different than everyone else, and we only just now found out how he was calculating it. Below is part of the rules from the PRD site.

Critical Hits: When you make an attack roll and get a natural 20 (the d20 shows 20), you hit regardless of your target's Armor Class, and you have scored a “threat,” meaning the hit might be a critical hit (or “crit”). To find out if it's a critical hit, you immediately make an attempt to “confirm” the critical hit—another attack roll with all the same modifiers as the attack roll you just made. If the confirmation roll also results in a hit against the target's AC, your original hit is a critical hit. (The critical roll just needs to hit to give you a crit, it doesn't need to come up 20 again.) If the confirmation roll is a miss, then your hit is just a regular hit.

A critical hit means that you roll your damage more than once, with all your usual bonuses, and add the rolls together. Unless otherwise specified, the threat range for a critical hit on an attack roll is 20, and the multiplier is ×2.

Does that mean, that when I roll damage for a critical hit with my longsword, with a +3 strength modifier, I roll 1d8 twice and add the +3 from strength to both die rolls, or only add it once after both die results have been totalled? The wording is a little confusing and can go both ways. We've traditionally gone with the D&D 3.5 way since that's what we're used to, though after further review, it seems it could be interpreted either way. Any help on this would be greatly appreciated. Should also note, that the core rulebook we have states the rule above verbatim. Thanks in advance.

Liberty's Edge

Alright, so I've done a lot of research, or at least as much as I could being limited to the PRD resources. I have two questions regarding Brilliant Energy weapons and armor worn by opponents.

1) Magical Enhancmenet Bonuses on armor still count towards your AC against Brilliant Energy attacks, right? If I'm wearing +3 Leather Armor, would the +3 magical bonus still protect me against a Brilliant Energy weapon even though the +2 bonus from Leather armor wouldn't?

2) Is there any magical effect that can be put on armor to be effective at blocking Brilliant Energy? Like Ghost Touch? I would think Ghost Touch effectively changes the armor from being physical armor to some sort of incorporeal armor. And since Brilliant Energy harmlessly passes through physical non-living matter, would Ghost Touch armor provide it's protection against a Brilliant Energy weapon?

Any help will be appreciated. The BBEG of our game has both BE melee and ranged weapons and short of using Mage Armor, the whole party has no reason to wear armor anymore. Thanks in advance.

-Agent

Liberty's Edge

Oh, and one other thing. Don't forget environmental effects, or random creatures and stuff. Like all food in a 100 mile radius turns to dust. Or the nearest Lich becomes Lawful Good in alignment. I have one that the tarrasque wakes up, then sets up a trade goods store outside a small village. With stuff like these, it prevents a bunch of stuff just happening to the players, and gives the game world a bunch of extra flavor.

Liberty's Edge

Ok, so I noticed this was an old post. However, as I'm currently implimenting my own wild surge stuff in my game, I figured it was relevant.

What I do is have certain effects be permanent, others temporary, like 2d4 days or something. Depends on the effect. If it's a particularly nasty game or class breaker, then I make it temporary depending on how bad it is. Dropping the caster's primary attribute to 3? Maybe 24 hours. Give them 3d10 temporary Hit Points? 24 hours or until they're used up, whichever happens first. Permanent 1d8 Hit Point loss, well, permanent.

In the event they get a permanent effect that they don't want, then they can get it/they removed with a Greater Restoration spell cast by a Cleric of at least 1 level higher than the character.

To help regulate them, and make them more even, I make it where whenever anyone uses a spell or magic item, and rolls a Critical Fumble then the surge happens (magic items include magic weapons). When in wild magic areas, I have them roll a d20 when they cast, and a result of 1 to 3 is a surge. And not all surges have to be devastating to the character. I have surges that make the spell automatically Maximized, as the Feat, and cast as if the caster was 5 levels higher. Or it affects everyone in a 100 fot radius except the caster and the potential target. This makes things like Mage Armor affect multiple targets. Other things, like encasing the target in chocolate shell are comical effects that happen instead of the spell being cast.

Getting a character's foot and nose switched doesn't have to be permanent. Something like that, I would make last for like 1d4 days before it's changed back. Though spending 100 XP per character level per surge is a bit much. Maybe 100 gp per character per surge? Makes them either choose to buy the new shiny magic sword, or get a surge effect removed. Like I said earlier, I use the Greater Restoration spell to get them removed. But with that, one casting removes only one effect, and it requires money to pay the cleric. Otherwise, don't make all the effects permanent. Just my two copper.


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