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Dog Fairy Doll

A 2E Floppy-Eared Golem's page

326 posts (504 including aliases). No reviews. No lists. No wishlists. 8 aliases.


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*cough*

*sigh*


Impressive. A great new twist on a story out of classical mythology. keen unholy vorpal sheers +5, nice touch.


Indeed, that map is an inspiration.


Well, yeah, Hugo seems like the obvious choice. If you're not familiar wtih his work, LPJ, do take a look. Marvelous stuff.

Glad to hear that the project hasn't been doomed, and looking forward to some news, eventually.


Urizen wrote:
I got the winners announcement mixed with another contest that was already completed. Nothing hasn't been mentioned on this and I have no idea what's going to happen with this. *shrug*

I checked with LPJDesign via twitter on the 14th and got this response.

*shrug*


LMPjr007 wrote:
I will be making a comment about this soon, BUT I don't think this is going to be what you want to hear. More to come.

Bump.

Would like to hear what's going on with this contest, even if the news is that it's been canceled.


Wow, due to a thread bump I now see that Exiled Prince asked almost the same exact question in regard to another system at the beginning of November:

http://paizo.com/paizo/messageboards/community/gaming/otherRPGs/aQuestionAb outCopyrights&page=1#0

Guess I didn't dig deep enough.


Sebastian wrote:

Copyright law is a pretty complex beast, so if you really want a good answer from a lawyer, you need to pay one. It's not a good idea for lawyers to give people legal advice on the internet for free (nor is it a good idea to rely on legal advice you receive on the internet for free).

The big problem is that, although the basic principal you stated (you can't copyright mechanics) is correct, interpreting what exactly that means is very difficult. At the end of the day, you are unlikely to get a clear brightline test or answer. Without a license or other express right to use someone else's intellectual property, the best you can do is mitigate the risks of being sued by cleaving as closely as possible to existing case law. You will always have some risk that the copyright owner will claim that your product infringes. Even if their claim is entirely without merit, the lack of a brightline test means that it would be difficult for a judge to dismiss the claim out of hand. As a result, if you were sued, you would likely incur substantial legal fees in defending your right to use the material even if you are not infringing on any copyrighted materials.

Note that this is not legal advice in any way, shape, or form. It's just a quick overview of why relying upon general principals in copyright law does not provide much protection.

Excellent answer. That's helpful and goes a good way towards clarifying the issue for me. Well, not clarify exactly, since you are saying that there is a huge spectrum of grey areas and untested or unprecedented legal territory just waiting to be explored through lawsuits. I certainly don't have the capital to be incurring legal fees and am not interested in inviting them, nor do I have extra money at hand at the moment to pay a lawyer for advice. Thanks for taking the time to sketch out that overview for me.


Brian E. Harris wrote:
As A Man In Black stated, strictly speaking, a rule, method or formula is not able to be protected by copyright. We have patents for a reason.

Right, there's a difference between patents and copyrights. My question was about copyright law in regard to games.


Thanks for the input, Pming and Wraith. That's helpful and encouraging, and rather in line with how I am perceiving the issue. Are either of you lawyers? While OSRIC makes reference to and reprints the OGL in order to cover potential legal issues, it is not based on a d20 mechanic or derivative of 3e in any way that I can see. It also is not exactly a free project, as hard copies of the books are for sale at what seem to be profitable prices.

I'm looking forward to more input. In the meantime, I've decided, nevermind 2e and AD&D, I'll take it from scratch: check out my new project, Creatheater, which takes an explicit stance on game rules being social property, not intellectual property, and therefore not subject to copyright.


Gorbacz wrote:

The copyright does not protect the name "role-playing game", the idea (a bunch of folks playing imaginary interactive theatre) and the method (use of dice to determine results based on pre-generated data).

It protects the name Dungeons and Dragons, the 2ed mechanics, the 2ed monsters and spells.

If you would start to publish and sell 2ed supplementary material, I would expect a cease and desist letter shortly. If not worse.

The OGL lifts legal protection of stuff included in the SRD.

Pretty simple :)

Is it that simple? From the link:

"Copyright does not protect the idea for a game, its name or title, or the method or methods for playing it. Nor does copyright protect any idea, system, method, device, or trademark material involved in developing, merchandising, or playing a game. Once a game has been made public, nothing in the copyright law prevents others from developing another game based on similar principles. Copyright protects only the particular manner of an author’s expression in literary, artistic, or musical form.

Material prepared in connection with a game may be subject to copyright if it contains a suf&#64257;cient amount of literary or pictorial expression. For example, the text matter describing the rules of the game or the pictorial matter appearing on the gameboard or container may be registrable."

The OSRIC project also serves as an interesting example:

About OSRIC™

OSRIC™ represents a compilation of rules for old school-style fantasy gaming. The book is intended to reproduce underlying rules used in the late 1970s to early 1980s, which being rules are not subject to copyright, without using any of the copyrighted "artistic presentation" originally used to convey those rules. In creating this new "artistic presentation," we have made use of the System Reference Document produced by Wizards of the Coast.

--------------------------------------

The rules and mechanics are not subject to copyright. The "artistic presentation", including trademarked names, are protected. It seems like if someone were to develop supplemental materials for 2nd edition rules without using/violating trademarks, that would be legal. If someone were to produce an OSRIC-like document compiling the rules and mechanics of 2nd edition AD&D in a new artistic presentation, would that be acceptable?

It would be helpful to hear from lawyers. If you are a lawyer, please state that in your reply.

EDIT: I see from his profile that Gorbacz is a lawyer. Thanks for your response, Gorbacz. What is your take on the approach of the OSRIC™ folks?


I am interested in developing, publishing, marketing, and sellng supplemental material and adventures for 2e AD&D rules, but am confused about the legality of this. There has been a huge amount of work put into the development of 3e's Open Gaming License and the products spawned by the d20 system, but looking at this page about copyright law, it seems that all of that was just an exercise in smokescreen and stupidity:

"Copyright does not protect the idea for a game, its name or title, or the method or methods for playing it." Full text

Any lawyers viewing this thread, please comment. Anyone who has developed AD&D compatible products outside of the OGL, please comment as well.

Thanks in advance...


Here is my submission for Monster #1:

SMOAT
(Monster #1)

“The digestive organs of the smoat are most curious, primarily consisting of a series of stone-like bladders containing sulfurous acid. These stones are housed within a meshwork of mucous and greasy membranes, which in turn are surrounded by constantly-regenerating dry pulp, which is extremely combustible. We've been unable to work out exactly where in this system nutrients break down, mostly due to a startling variety of the arrangement of these structures from one smoat to another. The most acceptable theory at the present time is that the mucosa intermediate in the digestive structure are the site of nutrient breakdown and absorption. Most researchers generally accept the theory that the pulp acts as kindling for the intense heat generation that takes place within the gullet and which can be expelled through the creature's vents; although novel dissenting theories about the function of pulp have been advanced, they are generally discounted as they do not account for the combustion that happens within the creature.”

--Pilar Esuve, researcher, quoted from her Treatise on Smoats and Their Variations

Overview

Ranging from twenty to thirty feet in length, these huge plated worms are ravenous omnivores that plague cold desert wastes, tundras, and glaciers. Even when domesticated as mounts by the most fearsome barbarians, in the chaos of pitched battle a smoat is as likely to eat its rider as it would his opponent.

A smoat is covered in thick segments of tissue, hardened by callouses, burns, and scars into wildly cracked plates and scales. At the base of its fanged orifice, two sets of steaming vents hiss and crackle with the sulfuric combustion of its digestive tract. Every so often, these circular and rectangular openings in the worm's crusty hide give forth belches of flame, steam, and sulfuric gas. When a terrible sight breaks forth ominously from frozen and quaking ground, bringing with it the stink of brimstone, wise adventurers steel themselves against the onslaught that is to come.

Smoats are not native to glacial regions, needing access to sulfurous depths of earth in order to reproduce; however, they are at times found in glacial areas. Whether these glacial-dwelling smoats are a variant of the species or have somehow wandered from tundras onto glaciers is a subject that has yet to be resolved. In civilized areas bordering glacial regions, research scholars are willing to pay handsome sums for intact smoat cadavers.

Smoat eggs are prized by wild sorcerers of tundras and deserts, being used to brew oily elixirs of fire-breathing. Shamans prefer to capture the larvae, which they roast and consume in proud rituals, claiming that this magical food builds their vitality and induces a clarity of mind which continues for up to two weeks. Of course, both the eggs and larvae are fiercely defended by the parent smoat. In the hands of a skilled enchanter, the sulfurous stones of a smoat's innards can be used to craft acidic blades as well as prized flametongue swords.

There are tales of smoats being subdued and used as mounts. Oral traditions of desert and tundra warrior cultures carry the knowledge of how to do this: vulnerable points exist at the intersection of a worm's plates. A certain technique of applying pressure can be learned that allows a skilled rider to goad the smoat over land. A subdued smoat, as has been noted above, is likely to turn on its rider and attempt to make a meal out of her at the first opportunity. Smoats must be mounted at the fourth segment or beyond; any closer than that to the creature's orifice and steam vents puts the rider at serious risk for being steamed alive.

Ecology

Smoats are solitary creatures. Hermaphrodites, they reproduce by laying a half dozen fertilized eggs annually. Eggs are nested deep underground in sulfurous springs, where the parent keeps a lair to guard them until, two weeks after they have been laid, the young reach the larval stage. During the larval stage, the creatures are highly vulnerable and function as a colony which resembles a cluster of tentacles grouped around a central sac. The sac collects and condenses minerals from the surrounding water into a steady stream of food for the grubs. During this time, the parent smoat continues to guard its offspring, but ventures to the surface more and more frequently to satisfy its returning appetite, which is dormant during the initial two-week nesting period. The larval stage lasts three weeks, after which the parent abandons the grubs. The grubs separate themselves from the nutrient-rich sac, which dissolves into the surrounding spring while the metamorphosing young burrow into the mineral-rich floor of the pool to complete their development. A smoat reaches full maturity some three months after burrowing. At that time, it emerges as a huge worm and first seeks the surface, where it begins to hunt.

Smoats thrive on a varied diet of minerals (they are especially fond of copper and basalt, although the latter is difficult to find in their usual terrains), mammals, and vegetation. Some have observed smoats vocalizing disturbing sounds as they crunch on a creature's bones, as if they are particularly enjoying this experience. When satiated, a smoat burrows deep underground, creating a temporary lair where it will sleep for one to two days before needing to feed again.

Combat

Upon sensing movement above, a smoat burrows upward, attempting to break through the ground directly under a creature. Rocketing upward with its huge maw stretched open, its talon-like teeth close upon its prey, grinding it to a pulp and attempting to swallow the unfortunate target whole. Aside from its intended target, any creature within twenty feet of the rupture caused by an ascending smoat is likely knocked aside or sent flying, affected by the worm's improved bull rush. Characters tossed into the air this way rise 5 to 20 feet (5d4) in the air and are subject to falling damage. A character who has been swallowed whole is subject to heat damage from the burning sulfur that flares inside the worm's gullet.

Large heat vents ring the two segments just behind the smoat's fanged orifice. Any character climbing onto these segments of the creature is subject to its heat attack. These vents serve to melt ice and soften frozen sands as the creature traverses underground areas. Unless a smoat has stuffed itself to capacity (50 HD) with its prey, it has complete voluntary control over the emissions from these vents. A fully distended smoat loses control of these heat vents, which discharge 5-8 (1d4+4) times at random (check every round; 50% chance each round until completely vented). When burrowing at less than 10' deep, there is a chance that an involuntary explosion could cause a surface rupture, sending solid ground and characters flying up to 10' in the air. Characters in the area directly over the burrowing smoat may be subject to falling damage or damage from flying debris. Also, it is not uncommon for a smoat to have learned of the effectiveness of this approach, and to work this explosive strategy against its prey before surfacing. Generally, a smoat's great hunger drives it to surface quickly and attempt to swallow a creature whole, rather than spend much time toying with its prey from underneath in this way.

A smoat will continue to attack and eat until it has consumed 50 HD of creatures. In the event that it is overwhelmed in combat and fails morale, it will make one last desperate power attack before burrowing back into the sands or ice.


jocundthejolly wrote:
A 2E Floppy-Eared Golem wrote:
Steven T. Helt wrote:

This exercise was a lot of fun. I invite critiques or questions, assuming that's ok with our host.

On to more monster building!

Since no one else has mentioned it to you, I will: All of your entries are below the 1000 word entry minimum. Hate to be the bearer of bad news, but if you are working on more entries, you will want to note:

LMPjr007 wrote:
The "fluff" submission text should be at least 1,000 words in length but no more than 2,500 words. Don't write less or more than the stated amount or you will be eliminated from the contest. You can submit as mant times as you like to any of the three monsters. Good Luck!
Thanks for the warning, but mine clocks in at 1056 in Word, so I should be fine. My understanding is that I can do one 1000+ word monster, and I picked #3.

Jocund, my post was directed at Helt, who had placed multiple submissions under the word count. As I understand it, contestants are free to submit any number of entries, even multiple entries for the same monster, as long as they are between 1000 and 2500 words. No red flags for you. :)


Steven T. Helt wrote:

This exercise was a lot of fun. I invite critiques or questions, assuming that's ok with our host.

On to more monster building!

Since no one else has mentioned it to you, I will: All of your entries are below the 1000 word entry minimum. Hate to be the bearer of bad news, but if you are working on more entries, you will want to note:

LMPjr007 wrote:
The "fluff" submission text should be at least 1,000 words in length but no more than 2,500 words. Don't write less or more than the stated amount or you will be eliminated from the contest. You can submit as mant times as you like to any of the three monsters. Good Luck!


LMPjr007 wrote:
In this contest, LPJ Design will supply contestants with three (3) different stat blocks of monsters to use with the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game. The contestants of the Monsters by Design Project/Contest will create the cool and interesting parts like appearance, back story, combat tactics better known as “The Fluff” for these stat blocks.

So are we to assume that the fluff should be integrated into the official Pathfinder Chronicles setting? Or can it/should it be more generic?


Gender is a construct. A golem is also a construct. Therefore, my gender is a golem. It says up there I'm a golem. What? That's a race. Bookseller 3, Reader 3, Writer 2, Illustrator 1, DM 1, Bewildered Militant Punk Hippy 5

RF, the longsword +2 is yours if you want it. On the other hand, if you are going to take the Oath Bow, I guess Cal can use the longsword as a backup weapon, in case anything happens to his greatsword.


A 2E Floppy-Eared Golem wrote:
Crimson Jester wrote:
Well then I have a simple answer for you...don't read it.
Thanks, I was beginning to come to that conclusion myself. ;)

I am going to finish it though. I mean, it's a major work of fantasy, right? I want to finish it, and be able to either appreciate it or judge it, or both. ;)


JoelF847 wrote:
The references to ancient history good vs. evil wars are simply a case of the winners writing the history. Of course they're going to say that their enemies were EVIL.

That's not exactly how it reads in the book. To me, it's the narrator flat out telling the reader, long ago, there were wars between the forces of good and the forces of evil. It's not presented as the Elves' version of history, but the reality of the world.

JoelF847 wrote:
In addition, as for your desire to know more about demon culture, there is a later trillogy that deals with this quite a bit.

What is the name of that series? That might be something I'd read.


Kirth Gersen wrote:
I liked Ursula LeGuin OK (read the "Earthsea" books and "Lathe of Heaven"), but I wouldn't go out of my way to find more of her stuff.

The Dispossessed was excellent, if ever you are inclined to read her again.

Sheri S. Tepper's Six Moon Dance is another great read; part fantasy, part sci-fi.

Octavia Butler also writes some interesting books. Kindred is worth a read.


Crimson Jester wrote:
Well then I have a simple answer for you...don't read it.

Thanks, I was beginning to come to that conclusion myself. ;)


Tigger_mk4 wrote:
YOu're not alone in some ways- I tend to shy away from female writers of fantasy. I know its a bad habit as there are many good ones out there, but still...

It has nothing to do with her being a woman. My knee-jerk recoil has to do with the marketing ploy of adding the silent "h" to her name. Yeah, I realize that that's a dumb, unthinking way to decide not to read an author, but I also think that adding an "h" to the end of your name to try to sell more books is a dumb thing to do. I'm happy to displace this reaction, though, and read some of her stuff. I actually tend to like feminine authors more than masculine ones.


Mairkurion {tm} wrote:
Callous Jack wrote:
Well, typically many fantasy books have the good-vs-evil bit going for them, so I'm not sure what you were hoping for in this case but I guess we all have different expectations.
Yeah...I thought people who wanted evil-vs-evil instead just read the newspaper...

No, it's not that I want "evil-vs-evil" but, really, Terry Brooks' Elfstones seems to be simplistic to me. The first fifty pages or so are full of references to the "great wars" where "good" fought "evil". To me, that's ridiculous. I don't think that people in the world go around thinking, "I want to be evil." There may be a selection of psychopaths who do this, but I don't think that in general that's how people and groups of people behave. Now I understand that in Brooks' fantasy world there are evil demons who are basically psychopathic and want to totally destroy everything and everyone except themselves.

The question may arise, "Why would someone read fantasy if they want a semblance of real-world social structures?" Well, because fantasy stuff is fun and interesting. Orcs are interesting. Extra-planar creatures are interesting. Elves are interesting, faeries are interesting! Magic and people living by their wits are exciting and interesting. What I don't think is very interesting is simplistic reductions of social forces. "Good" vs. "Evil" just doesn't strike me as very innovative or even authentic.

In the case of the Elfstones, it would be a better book in my opinion if Brooks moved away from the reductionism of "good" and "evil" and instead described the difference between elven societies and demon societies, if the demons have anything resembling societies. If they don't, and they are all a bunch of sociopathic killers, I want the author to explain to me why they haven't all ripped each others' throats out. If there is some bond between them or restriction or taboo that keeps them from doing that, that makes for interesting stories. But telling the reader that the elves are "good" and the demons "evil" makes me feel like I've stepped back to a pre-teen reading level, which perhaps is the audience a book like this is marketed to, but I'm not sure. I think I would have enjoyed it more if I read it when I was younger, but since I'm in my 30s now, I want more depth.


Gender is a construct. A golem is also a construct. Therefore, my gender is a golem. It says up there I'm a golem. What? That's a race. Bookseller 3, Reader 3, Writer 2, Illustrator 1, DM 1, Bewildered Militant Punk Hippy 5
lynora wrote:
I'm most likely in, but I don't have any of the LoF stuff. Still, how hard can it be? I'm in an Eberron game without ever having read an Eberron book, and a Planescape game with never having read any of that setting either :) At least I know some stuff about Golarion :) I won't have time to make a character for a few days yet at least, so if that's going to be a problem than I can bow out.

Sometimes it can be fun to go into a game knowing nothing or next to nothing. The sense of discovery becomes much wider! ;)


Gender is a construct. A golem is also a construct. Therefore, my gender is a golem. It says up there I'm a golem. What? That's a race. Bookseller 3, Reader 3, Writer 2, Illustrator 1, DM 1, Bewildered Militant Punk Hippy 5
Steve Geddes wrote:

For those of you who are interested, I received my copy of Howl of the Carrion King today (Legacy of Fire - chapter one). I'm just paging through it now... :)

As I mentioned a few days ago, I'm not going to get a chance to run this on paper for some years, so would like to try in PBP format - the five of you would all be welcome to take a spot if you wish. I'll give you a week or so to say yes or no, then advertise for any vacancies and start a discussion thread. Let me know if you want a place (I won't be offended if not and the J1 game will continue as is, I'm just looking to add another)

Ah, I would love to jump in on a second game DM'ed by Monty Haul, but unfortunately my life this summer is going to be quite frazzled, as I am moving cross-country and will be basically an itinerant bum from about May until August. Needless to say, this will probably throw a giant monkey-wrench in my PbP activity, and I am sorry about that. I'll let you know how I think Kimu's participation in J1 will be affected as May gets closer. I should have internet access during the transition, but able to post every day, I will not be. :(


Gender is a construct. A golem is also a construct. Therefore, my gender is a golem. It says up there I'm a golem. What? That's a race. Bookseller 3, Reader 3, Writer 2, Illustrator 1, DM 1, Bewildered Militant Punk Hippy 5
Nevynxxx wrote:

In a slightly different vein; As our characters are supposed to be keeping diaries for the Pathfinders? Who plans to?

I for one am thinking hard about it, and will be posting up a thread in the Campaign Journals forum once the first day finally comes to a close....Anyone want to join me?

I may like to do a campaign journal as well.


Well, I should probably get over my pretensions about her marketing name and check out her stuff. She's gotten a lot of praise in this thread, and I have to say that the cover art for one of her Faded Sun books really caught my eye and piqued my interest, but that's a nod to the artist, I guess, and not Cherry. But I realize I am simply uninformed and arrogant when I dismiss her off hand for a marketing ploy that was not even her idea. I'll try to read something by her soon.


Callous Jack wrote:
Well, typically many fantasy books have the good-vs-evil bit going for them, so I'm not sure what you were hoping for in this case but I guess we all have different expectations.

That is true to an extent. But read something by Charles de Lint, China Mieville, or Francesca Lia Block and you'll discover some different approaches to fantasy story-telling. In Perdido Street Station, it's not so much good vs. evil as it is a man obsessed with science living without a whole lot of scruples in a city with little regard for decency, democracy, or dignity, accidentally unleashing terrible, monstrous horrors out into the city. Charles de Lint places idealistic characters within stark urban landscapes, mixing in fantastic elements into an otherwise modern-day setting. Plus, they both have excellent prose styles, something which I find lacking in Elfstones.


Billzabub wrote:

A Good and Happy Child, by Justin Evans.

That looks interesting. Can you share some details with us? I'm not looking for spoilers or major plot points, but more along the lines of, "what did you like about it?" and "what's the style of writing like?"


Tarren Dei wrote:
A 2E Floppy-Eared Golem wrote:

Cool. I like the concept of a bleached-out gnome inadvertently stumbling onto doom.

I wonder where Bellis is.

Bellis is in the Verduran Forest on the Sellen river in between Taldor and Andoran. It's a pretty cool location, actually, if your characters want to joust in Taldor and fight kobolds in Darkmoon Vale all in the same month. Has Bellis been fleshed out in any other products or will this be our first glance at it?

EDIT: You are also a few days from Galt, Kyonin, and Druma. Bellis would be a great place to set up a home base for DMs wanting to play in any of these regions.

Thanks for the info. I am about to run Hollow's Last Hope/Crown of the Kobold King, set in Darkmoon Vale, and I'd also be interested in learning more about Bellis, if there is more to be learned. I'll have to check my PFC Campaign Setting.


Cool. I like the concept of a bleached-out gnome inadvertently stumbling onto doom.

I wonder where Bellis is.


I guess I'm here to crash the party.

I am currently reading the legendary Elfstones of Shannara, and have been rather underwhelmed. Granted, it seems to have gotten better as I've gone along, but I can't tell if the story is growing on me or if I have just resigned myself to the good-vs-evil schlock and have dulled the inner critic enough to sedately go along with the ride. I'm at about page 200. Demons are killing elves.


What about a guy named Karl Wagner? I've never read any Conan or the Wheel of Time, for that matter, but I've read some hype about Karl Wagner. Anyone got an opinion? Super-opinionated, Hunter S. Thompson-style opinions are greatly appreciated by the way. Don't sanitize anything on account of me.


Gender is a construct. A golem is also a construct. Therefore, my gender is a golem. It says up there I'm a golem. What? That's a race. Bookseller 3, Reader 3, Writer 2, Illustrator 1, DM 1, Bewildered Militant Punk Hippy 5
baron arem heshvaun wrote:


Floppy I'm not sure how best to 'divy up' the treasure, but the leader's armour is on par with mine I'll give you my armour and I'll take the stealth qualities for use with my ranger/scout unless another character can benefit from it more.

Also who here is really good with a long sword ? I was kind of eyeing the bow but Amie's diety has that as a favored weapon so we can decide as a group.

You can have the mithral +2, being the ranger. I was interested in it for its light weight and its neat-o silenced quality, but would rather keep the +2 chain mail I've already got than go +1 mithral.

None of the other stuff really works for Cal.


Andrew Turner wrote:
A 2E Floppy-Eared Golem wrote:

The only Piers Anthony I ever read was On a Pale Horse, and I thought it was so very terrible that I stopped reading after the third chapter or so. I did indulge in the author's egocentric "Author's Note," where he blew his own horn about how he had run a marathon and what an incredible writer he is. I cringed, laughed, and almost cried.

Hopefully the man has written some good books, because he's certainly written enough of them.

I love Anthony's work. I actually find his author's notes (usually very lengthy) to be what I look forward to the most.

:D

And this kind of thing is what makes the world go 'round. Different strokes for different folks. ;)


btw, that flag in the background of the cover looks very similar to the flag of Cheliax. Odd. Oh, and the character could be a Harrower. Hmmm... perhaps more placeholder art?


The only Piers Anthony I ever read was On a Pale Horse, and I thought it was so very terrible that I stopped reading after the third chapter or so. I did indulge in the author's egocentric "Author's Note," where he blew his own horn about how he had run a marathon and what an incredible writer he is. I cringed, laughed, and almost cried.

Hopefully the man has written some good books, because he's certainly written enough of them.


Nevynxxx wrote:
Zuxius wrote:
I want to end up in a strip bar with James Jacobs
There are Great Old Ones who induce less fear than that sentence, then it occurred to me that James may not be the one stripping.....

lol... yeah I read it the same way at first.


Gender is a construct. A golem is also a construct. Therefore, my gender is a golem. It says up there I'm a golem. What? That's a race. Bookseller 3, Reader 3, Writer 2, Illustrator 1, DM 1, Bewildered Militant Punk Hippy 5
baron arem heshvaun wrote:


I have some questions for 2E Floppy and any of you who may be versed in Ad&d and 2Ed, Nightwish and the gang do you mind if I use our OOC thread for this ?

(I'm attempting to convert some old adventures and creatures.)

Oooooh! Fire away! If no one else minds. ;)


James Jacobs wrote:
A 2E Floppy-Eared Golem wrote:

Quite cool, but I need a detailed map of Katapesh! I don't mind the crude rendition in the LoF Player's Guide, but it would be helpful to know exactly where in the Lower City Aromas and Aphrodisiacs is, for example.

Dark Markets: A Guide to Katapesh has a more detailed, full-page map of that city.

Ah, thank you for that!


Quite cool, but I need a detailed map of Katapesh! I don't mind the crude rendition in the LoF Player's Guide, but it would be helpful to know exactly where in the Lower City Aromas and Aphrodisiacs is, for example.


Mikaze wrote:
I just did a double-take. Ownership of the old TSR art went back over to the original artists after all? I'm not sure how that was set up.

Yeah, I thought that artwork looked a little old-school familiar. And the adventure summary reads real familiar, too. I can't quite place it, but I think that there's a very similar adventure out there for a previous incarnation of D&D. Of course, isn't that kind of Goodman Games schtick? Vintage D&D, updated for the modern gamer?


Gender is a construct. A golem is also a construct. Therefore, my gender is a golem. It says up there I'm a golem. What? That's a race. Bookseller 3, Reader 3, Writer 2, Illustrator 1, DM 1, Bewildered Militant Punk Hippy 5

Could I also switch out the Improved Sunder feat for the Molthuni Discipline feat detailed on page 103 of the Campaign Setting? I just got the CS this weekend and wasn't aware of this option when I created Cal. It seems appropriate for him.


Gender is a construct. A golem is also a construct. Therefore, my gender is a golem. It says up there I'm a golem. What? That's a race. Bookseller 3, Reader 3, Writer 2, Illustrator 1, DM 1, Bewildered Militant Punk Hippy 5
Nightwish wrote:


Given that we are all learning this new system together, I'll allow you to do that. However, I wouldn't call the enchantment totally useless, and there may be situations in the future where you will be sufficiently surround on all sides that you can take maximum advantage of the bonus. It does stack with your feats, giving one additional attack above the highest number allowed by your feats. So, if your feats combine to allow you to attack three adjacent opponents, for instance (I don't know if they do, I don't have them in front of me at the moment), then the Mighty Cleave would allow you to attack a fourth adjacent opponent. And with the theme of war, there is a possibility that you will eventually find yourselves on a real battlefield (with whole armies, I mean), surrounded by enemies in just such a way that Cleave/Great Cleave/Mighty Cleaving would give you a very distinct advantage. It just wouldn't be helpful in every combat.

The way I am interpreting the Great Cleave feat (could be wrong) is that it allows the character to extend the cleave indefinitely as long as the attack rolls continue to hit and all the targets are within reach. Check out Great Cleave on page 86 of the Beta and let me know how you interpret that.

Regardless, I think I'll switch out the mighty cleaving enchantment for frost, since frost seems to me to be more valuable in most combat situations. Thanks for being lenient during the first level of noobishness. :)


Gender is a construct. A golem is also a construct. Therefore, my gender is a golem. It says up there I'm a golem. What? That's a race. Bookseller 3, Reader 3, Writer 2, Illustrator 1, DM 1, Bewildered Militant Punk Hippy 5

Nightwish, I put up a request on the OOC thread. When you have a moment, could you take a look and consider it? Thanks.


Thanks for the info, Turin! It looks like ICE is in Charlottesville, which is about two hours away, but Pinnacle Entertainment, who've got some pretty bizarro products that caught my attention, including a setting by Andy Hobb, originated in Blacksburg.


I will be relocating to the Roanoke-Salem, Virginia area in early August, and I figured I'd go ahead and put a line out to see if there are any gamers or game designers interested in collaborating in that area. I've recently returned to D&D after many years. When I last played, I was using the 2e rules, but this year I've familiarized myself with 3.5 and the PFRPG Beta, and am looking forward to the official release of PFRPG later this year. My main interest is in game design, then GM'ing/DM'ing, and then playing. Since I'm a novice with the 3.whatever rules, I'm actually a little more interested in playing than usual, so that I can get some experience with the system.

Anyone out there?


Hey Navdi. I think that the competition for this round must have been stiff. Your scenario proposal is compact and interesting. I especially like the bungling Jak and the equally false tribe of "natives." Perhaps the encounters aren't presented as challenging enough. You've got five encounters but only two that are noted with encounter levels. It may have helped if you detailed the collapse in encounter five a bit more and assigned it an EL. Also, you might have considered making the consequences of success and failure a bit higher, as this is a relatively high-level scenario.

Keep designing and keep writing, though! All in all I think this is a great entry. It would seem that there was another entry submitted that topped this one, but that should not diminish your sense of accomplishment and satisfaction at having put together an excellent proposal.


Gender is a construct. A golem is also a construct. Therefore, my gender is a golem. It says up there I'm a golem. What? That's a race. Bookseller 3, Reader 3, Writer 2, Illustrator 1, DM 1, Bewildered Militant Punk Hippy 5

Okay, here's me pleading my ignorance and asking a favor of the DM:

Spoiler:

Nightwish, I'm a bit of a noob to 3.anything and PF. When I was building Cal, I saw the mighty cleave enchantment and misinterpreted it. The description says that the enchantment gives one extra cleave attempt per round. To me, that sounded like it was giving an extra attack: cleave once, all the way through, and then get to make another attack roll and start the whole series of cleave over again. Since I had built Cal with the Great Cleave feat, I thought this weapon was going to just make him an incredible cleaving machine, basically allowing him to cleave through a line of enemies twice in one round. Now that I've used cleave in a combat, I am beginning to understand how unlikely opportunities for the kind of cleaving I was envisioning are. Besides that, I understand now that this is not how the mighty cleave enchantment works.

So now I realize that I have bought Cal an enchanted sword that really doesn't give him any advantage that he didn't already have; I mean, he's already got the Great Cleave feat, so the sword of mighty cleaving just becomes totally redundant. My question is: would you allow me to exchange my useless mighty cleaving enchantment for the frost enchantment?


Azhagal wrote:
no takers for the zhedal?

Azhagal, I've got a small backlog, and considering that I haven't been drawing this week, it may be another couple of weeks before I can get to it, but I'd be interested in doing a version of the zhedal. Hopefully, though, someone else will trump me for it and do a version for you quicker, because I'm spending more time writing than illustrating currently.

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