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The Weeping Blade

by Josh Vogt

Chapter One: Blind Beggar’s Bind

"Alms!" Larem called to the afternoon marketplace crowd. "Have mercy and spare a coin. A blind man's blessing brings good fortune."

"Droble gamman! Obbly tolt!"

Larem winced as Dargley spouted his usual gibberish. He leaned over and nudged his fellow beggar.

"You're to keep your lips sealed, remember?"

"Foddum nibble?"


Larem may be blind, but he's still more perceptive than most people.

Despite the leather strap over his eyes, Larem sensed Dargley beaming a grin in clueless innocence, the attitude that had defined his existence since the head injury. Sighing, Larem took up his beggar bowl and shook the three copper coins it held.

"Alms," he cried. "Desna smiles upon those who pity the downtrodden."

Shouting rose above the din of Magnimarian hawkers, livestock, and cart traffic.

"Outta the way. Move it, you low-browed dungknuckles. You's never seen a man with no legs? Move it or I'll bite your arse and piss on your robe."

Larem sighed again. Had Beetle been drinking? Where'd he get the coin for it?

"Kick me again and you'll be missing some tasty toes."

Larem tuned one ear to listen for any gangs or guard patrols while the other picked up Beetle's shuffling approach. Grunts alternated with slaps of flesh on stone as Beetle swung along on his hands until he plopped onto the mat to Larem's left. The man reeked of sour wine, and the air about him gained an oily texture that made Larem want to scrub his face with sackcloth.

"Thanks for that," Larem said. "We'll be lucky if anyone gets near us for the rest of the day. What've I told you about threats?"

Beetle snorted. "They work well enough for this lot. Looking down on me like I's dirt."

"People look down on you because you don't come above their waistlines," Larem said. "You just decide to take it personally."

"Bilgrew mothy woll!"

"Too true, Dargley. Beetle needs to control his anger before someone runs him over with a coach."

Beetle spat into the dirt. "Let 'em try. First horse that tries to stamp me out will get its hooves ripped off."

Larem couldn't hide a smile at the idea. Once Beetle might've followed through on such a threat. Oversized shoulders and hands had lent him a freakish strength that made him a feared fighter in their band before...well...

Before this. Now those muscled arms only served to drag Beetle's mangled half-a-body around Beacon's Point, hauling him from one alehouse to another.

Beetle gargled mucus and spat again. "Listen, lads. I've got news."

Larem held his bowl out, though he knew no one stood near enough to toss. "I don't care which minor noble is mucking about with which courtesan at the House of Welcome."

"Shut it. Or I'll start spreading rumors that you've got good eyes under there."

Larem adjusted the blindfold covering the acid-scarred pits where his eyes used to be. "What's this news, then?"

Beetle rubbed his hands, calluses scraping like rough stone on leather. "They found another body stuffed in a sewer drain. Just outside the north end of Washers' Row."

Larem stiffened. "Same as the other three?"

"Ayup. Head gone. Chest split wide and all the innards gutted."

"Any clue as to the dead's identity?"

"City watch was stumped, but ol' Beetle knows his rascals. It were Tolly. He went missing from his spot down by the docks last week and I spotted that bird tattoo on his ankle when they hauled him away—the ugly pigeon he always loved showin' off."

"It was an osprey. And if so, that's four deaths. All victims from Rag's End."

Dargley pressed in close and moaned.

Larem patted his knee. "Not to fear. Nobody would snatch you in the middle of a crowded market."

Beetle cleared his throat with the grace of a rusty hinge. "So...what's we gonna do about it?"

"Do?"

"Course. I ain't spouting off 'cause I love me pretty voice." He dropped to a hoarse whisper. "A fiend's loose in Magnimar—right 'ere in this neighborhood, you betcha—and nobody dealt death to fiends like the Bloody Blade Brothers."

Larem slumped. "We aren't those men anymore. Haven't been in a long time. There's nothing we can do but pray whoever—or whatever—is behind the murders is dealt with quickly."

"Serious?" Beetle's fetid breath huffed over Larem. "It's been two months and ain't nobody got a lead on the bastard. Not even those Caydenites what set up the new bar 'cross the street from The Pig—and I made sure to check in with them a few times to be sure."

"I thought you were banned from there after stealing those bottles of holy wine."

"Not my fault they didn't lock the place up nice and tight. 'Sides, who's gonna turn down a petitioner seekin' a bit of courage to brave these dangerous streets? But all them priests are passin' out is worthless talismans and prayers."

"A cleric's protective measures are nothing to be scoffed at."

"Yeah? Look where they got us. I mean... don't, y'know, look... but..."

Larem grimaced. "I know what you mean. It doesn't change anything. We're not in any shape to confront such a foe."

"You's afraid."

"I'm pragmatic."

Beetle gripped his arm hard enough to make him drop his bowl. Coins clinked about.

"Rag's End folks be our people now. Who's gonna protect 'em but us? City watch don't give a spit who gets splattered, 'cept for having to clean up the mess. Nobles figure a few beggar deaths means less on the streets. Jaijarko and his Sczarni thugs only care if it means another gang edgin' in on their territory."

"Your point?"

"M'point is this is a cause. A reason to fight!"

"For you, being looked at askance is reason to fight."

This time the gobbet of spit struck Larem's cheek. "Lost your sight and lost your courage. I's shamed to squat beside you."

Beetle continued grumbling as he propped up on his hands and lugged himself off. Larem patted the stones and dirt until he found the three copper coins and replaced them in the bowl.

Dargley plucked at his tunic. "Plobbem gardley toodle?"

Larem wiped at his grimy cheek with a filthier sleeve. "He'll sleep off his anger and rejoin us tomorrow."

"Smolley chargarlum?"

"Yes. I'm sure." He fished out a coin and placed it in Dargley's hand. "Go get yourself a hot bun. I'll meet you by the main fountain in front of the Merchants' Guildhall in a couple hours. We're sure to encounter a few generous souls there."

"Wobbum!"

Dargley's footsteps pattered away, and Larem settled into his usual begging routine. Odd to feel so alone within the throng of merchants, browsers, and buyers. And why the twinge of guilt at brushing off Beetle's urgings?

Foolish to think any of them possessed a fraction of their former skill. Foolish to believe they could still make a difference.

When the swell of afternoon commerce ebbed, he gathered his meager belongings. The cheap dagger he kept under his mat got rolled up inside it. He then used the rolled mat to tap his way out of the market, bowl outstretched as he shuffled past shops, stables, and warehouses. He headed for Dockway, following the main road along Beacon's Point's docks.

The salty tang of the sea briefly wiped away the stink of the dirty, sweating crowds. Then the smell returned in force as he shuffled through one of the area's many slums. There, the ramshackle buildings crowded closer, casting cold shadows. Social chatter turned to mutters, whimpers, and grumbles, and the air grew pungent with unwashed refuse.

As he passed one alley—noted by the extra echo to his steps—several people moved to stand in his way. His rolled mat bumped a set of shins, and he stopped, jingling the coins in his bowl while internally bracing.

"Pity the destitute and enjoy blessed dreams."

The nearest man, a heavy breather who smelled of burnt oil, snatched the bowl away and dumped the coins out.

"You owe our master a hundred times this," came his smoke-roughened voice.

Larem swallowed. "As I explained last week, Samphy, the salves didn't work. I won't pay for ineffective remedies."

The flung bowl caught Larem in the forehead, and he stumbled back a step. He resisted the urge to rub his skull, knowing weakness only encouraged thugs to greater cruelty.

"You calling Master Ulus a liar?" Samphy had perfected the art of threatening growls. To Larem, who had heard much worse from fanged beasts as they attempted to devour him, the gang enforcer's sounded a pale imitation.

"I make no such claims. However, even if I were to pay, it's only been a week since your last visit. How was I to procure funds in such a short time?"

The gut-punch dropped him to his knees. The second blow cracked his head to the stones, where he lay gasping as red and yellow explosions flashed through the darkness of his skull.

Samphy crouched beside him. "Master Ulus doesn't enjoy having his reputation as a healer slighted. He also doesn't enjoy welchers. Now, I'm to collect the bill or collect a body. I'd prefer the first, but if there's no other choice..." He patted Larem's cheek. "You've got one more week."

One of Samphy's companions trod on an ankle as they stepped over him, drawing a last gasp of pain before they headed off.

Once alone, Larem felt about until he retrieved the bowl. Clutching it and the mat—with the dagger still inside—he crawled into the nearby alley to huddle and recover.

At least Beetle and Dargley hadn't been around. He'd never told them how he'd squirreled away a last pouch of gold from their adventures, then squandered it on false hope and fake healing elixirs peddled by the local Sczarni thugs. He should've seen the con coming a long way off, even without eyes.

Now not even hope remained.

Footsteps approached. A single person this time. Had Samphy or one of his lackeys returned?

He groaned as he gathered himself. "If I didn't find payment in a week, what will a few minutes have accomplished?"

A rattle alerted him to a coin tossed into his bowl. His trained ears figured it for silver.

Surprised, he raised his head and tried to fix on his unknown benefactor. The person stood before him, a deeper zone of silence in the quiet street. Waiting for...? Ah, of course. Larem swallowed blood and smiled crookedly.

"Desna will embrace your soul, kind... sir?"

He plucked up the offering to bless it with a kiss.

And froze.

The pall of death suffused the coin, an unearthly chill that iced his blood. True silver, by the polish of it, and new enough that he easily picked out the skull engraved on either side.

A burial coin. The type folks sometimes placed over a corpse's eyes before it was entombed.

The presence chuckled—a liquid, putrescent sound, accompanied by a wave of graveyard stink.

"Hello, Larem," it whispered. "I've been looking for you."

Coming Next Week: The hauntings of the past in Chapter Two of Josh Vogt's "The Weeping Blade"!

Josh Vogt is a freelance author with short stories published in such venues as Orson Scott Card’s Intergalactic Medicine Show and Shimmer. For more information, see his website at jrvogt.com.

Illustration by Mariana Gomez

More Web Fiction. More Paizo Blog.
Tags: Josh Vogt Mariana Gomez Pathfinder Tales Web Fiction

What's "-mdash"? At first I thought it was part of the character's way of thinking, but now I think it's some kind of formatting error. Good story though.


Being blind myself, I really appreciate the attention and accuracy of the details. Good start! I'm looking forward to the next installment.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

No offense to all the authors of Paizo Publishing, but are there seriously ANY HEROES IN GOLARION WHATSOEVER?

I mean, holy crap! We're getting enough stories of villains, scoundrels, abominations, and desperate souls to fill an ENTIRE LIBRARY!

Shadow Lodge

Devastation Bob wrote:
What's "-mdash"? At first I thought it was part of the character's way of thinking, but now I think it's some kind of formatting error. Good story though.

This is an M-dash: —

For some reason whenever printing one here, it's followed by ... well, its name. So yeah, format error. Weird.

Liberty's Edge

Orthos wrote:
Devastation Bob wrote:
What's "-mdash"? At first I thought it was part of the character's way of thinking, but now I think it's some kind of formatting error. Good story though.

This is an M-dash: —

For some reason whenever printing one here, it's followed by ... well, its name. So yeah, format error. Weird.

It does seem to be a formatting error. I wondered if it was the sound of something in the background, like the mat hitting the pavement.


This story did not contain enough –ndash!


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Berselius wrote:

No offense to all the authors of Paizo Publishing, but are there seriously ANY HEROES IN GOLARION WHATSOEVER?

I mean, holy crap! We're getting enough stories of villains, scoundrels, abominations, and desperate souls to fill an ENTIRE LIBRARY!

Heroes aren't supposed to be common...that's what makes them heroes :)

Liberty's Edge

Tirisfal wrote:
Berselius wrote:

No offense to all the authors of Paizo Publishing, but are there seriously ANY HEROES IN GOLARION WHATSOEVER?

I mean, holy crap! We're getting enough stories of villains, scoundrels, abominations, and desperate souls to fill an ENTIRE LIBRARY!

Heroes aren't supposed to be common...that's what makes them heroes :)

Yes, and I think that is where the PCs come in. Still, a few good examples are worthwhile.

Paizo Employee Digital Products Assistant

That was a formatting error on my part. I've replaced the mdash with all the — you could possibly want

Senior Editor/Fiction Editor

3 people marked this as a favorite.
Berselius wrote:

No offense to all the authors of Paizo Publishing, but are there seriously ANY HEROES IN GOLARION WHATSOEVER?

I mean, holy crap! We're getting enough stories of villains, scoundrels, abominations, and desperate souls to fill an ENTIRE LIBRARY!

Buy King of Chaos. The paladin there should be right up your alley. Also, Drelm and Elyana in the upcoming "Stalking the Beast" should fit your description of heroes as well. So there's two brand new novels for you, coming out in the next few months!

And for the record, I think it's unfair to label the characters in this story as "not heroic" this early--you haven't even seen what they do yet! Heroism is about action, not just looking good in shining full plate. The thing that captured me most about this story is that probably a *lot* of adventurers (heroic or otherwise) end up terribly injured, and the idea of a bunch of disabled vets as protagonists really struck a chord with me. It's not something we see a lot of!


2 people marked this as a favorite.

Oh, this is exciting! There aren't a lot of disabled heroes in fiction, period, and I'm really interested by this premise. It also does seem like there have been a disproportionate number of very dark gray antihero protagonists in the web fiction lately ("Best Served Cold," "Bastard, Sword"). Or maybe it only seems that way because the ones there have been, have been so extremely unsympathetic. When the only recent altruistic protagonists are terrorist abolitionists, who are ALSO decidedly unsympathetic, and besides them there's... well, a lot of lovable rogues with very mixed success at the 'lovable' part, it does start to seem like a one-sided world. Lots of people must like that kind of thing (see also: the popularity of A Song of Ice and Fire), but personally I find stories in the genre of Bad People Doing Bad Things To Worse People (what TVTropes calls "Black and Gray Morality") to be both boring and obnoxious.

Which is not to say they haven't been well-written, and I'm certainly still glad that Pathfinder Tales and the Web Fiction exist. I'm just glad to see stories like this one too, where it looks like the protagonists aren't perfect people or even necessarily powerful superhero types, but they want to do the right thing.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber; Pathfinder Comics Subscriber; Pathfinder Legends Subscriber

While I won't disagree that there have been a lot of rogues and "gray" protagonists in the Web Fiction and in the novels, I don't find the characters in this story to be "gray" At least, not yet. They certainly are desperate.

Also, I liked the protagonists in The Irregulars! I did not find them unsympathetic.

Also, I didn't find Roderick and Hrymn to be "dark gray," they struck me as more "light gray." I liked them, they were the most lovable rogues I have seen in the fiction. Part of what I liked about them was that their motivations were clear (gold), and that even though they would lie to everyone else, they would never lie to each other. Also, I liked that Roderick didn't want to kill people.

Krunzle, on the other hand, is "dark gray" and unsympathetic. I didn't like him


James Sutter wrote:
Berselius wrote:

No offense to all the authors of Paizo Publishing, but are there seriously ANY HEROES IN GOLARION WHATSOEVER?

I mean, holy crap! We're getting enough stories of villains, scoundrels, abominations, and desperate souls to fill an ENTIRE LIBRARY!

Buy King of Chaos. The paladin there should be right up your alley. Also, Drelm and Elyana in the upcoming "Stalking the Beast" should fit your description of heroes as well. So there's two brand new novels for you, coming out in the next few months!

And for the record, I think it's unfair to label the characters in this story as "not heroic" this early--you haven't even seen what they do yet! Heroism is about action, not just looking good in shining full plate. The thing that captured me most about this story is that probably a *lot* of adventurers (heroic or otherwise) end up terribly injured, and the idea of a bunch of disabled vets as protagonists really struck a chord with me. It's not something we see a lot of!

I agree with Berselius and thank you for the response and for highlighting the upcoming books that sound up my alley! I'll look into those!

I also understand where you're coming from. We've had some great stories to read here, but sometimes I just want a story with a genuine hero, real focus on GOOD.

I did love the Irregulars! More my kind of thing.

Contributor

1 person marked this as a favorite.

I like this very much, and with all due respect to the above comments, how can you look upon a disabled character in the opening scene of a story, and not knowing anything about how or why they became disabled, decide that they are not, were not, or won't be heroes?

Frankly, I've had quite enough stories of "perfect" heroes. I enjoyed many such stories in years past, but I want something more complex now. I like to see someone who might not be a typical "hero" evolve into one throughout the story. I'm guessing that's what we'll see here.

Also completely agree with James: Heroism is actions, not shiny armor.


Chris A Jackson wrote:
I like this very much, and with all due respect to the above comments, how can you look upon a disabled character in the opening scene of a story, and not knowing anything about how or why they became disabled, decide that they are not, were not, or won't be heroes?
Itchy wrote:
While I won't disagree that there have been a lot of rogues and "gray" protagonists in the Web Fiction and in the novels, I don't find the characters in this story to be "gray" At least, not yet. They certainly are desperate.

Maybe I wasn't clear, or maybe these comments are responding to someone else. I didn't mean to imply that I thought that the protagonists of "The Weeping Blade" were antiheroic at all, at least not in the way that I meant the term. (In the traditional sense of being main characters who are weak rather than powerful, they might qualify as antiheroes, but I have no problem with that kind of antihero.) Just the opposite; I meant to contrast them with many of the recent short story protagonists, who have been antiheroes in the modern sense: characters who are powerful or effective, but amoral. By contrast, even after just one installment of this story it seems clear that Larem and certainly Beetle are heroic, in that they want to do the right thing by other people in the slums, and what's preventing them is fear and practical concerns. I really like that, and found it refreshing!

As for which characters have been sympathetic or not, it's of course very subjective. For me, it's harder to find rogues of any stripe lovable, and basically impossible if said rogues don't have - well, maybe not hearts of gold, but at least hearts of mostly-decent. The main characters of "The Irregulars" were doing good things, but they were very ruthless, and I couldn't like them much. I certainly didn't like Krunzle either, though I didn't think it was fair to count him as recent since the story featuring him was from last year. But Marcov from "Best Served Cold" was a new low, as a self-admitted rapist and murderer. And again - these stories were well-done, I'm not judging people who like 'gritty' fantasy, very long redemption arcs can be interesting, etc. They're just not for me.

Grand Lodge

Berselius wrote:

No offense to all the authors of Paizo Publishing, but are there seriously ANY HEROES IN GOLARION WHATSOEVER?

I mean, holy crap! We're getting enough stories of villains, scoundrels, abominations, and desperate souls to fill an ENTIRE LIBRARY!

It looks like these guys used to be heroes and found out what the reward for heroism is. So stop flaming things you don't take the time to read.

BTW, I'm hooked and interested in where this story is going.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Chris A Jackson wrote:

I like this very much, and with all due respect to the above comments, how can you look upon a disabled character in the opening scene of a story, and not knowing anything about how or why they became disabled, decide that they are not, were not, or won't be heroes?

Frankly, I've had quite enough stories of "perfect" heroes. I enjoyed many such stories in years past, but I want something more complex now. I like to see someone who might not be a typical "hero" evolve into one throughout the story. I'm guessing that's what we'll see here.

Also completely agree with James: Heroism is actions, not shiny armor.

Perhaps it's because I'm younger and haven't read an many novels, but most of my experiences with stories have been angsty anti-heroes and scoundrals who become heroic in the 11th hour.

Paizo's short fiction was honestly what got me really reading novels in the past few years, so I had the opposite experience. I'd like some genuine heroes with an emphasis on the GOOD aspect of their alignment. Heroism to me involves their intentions as well as their actions.

I didn't mean to imply I didn't like this story, I merely jumped on the bandwagon. I'm hoping we end up with a Rocky like story of a shaken confidence.


Paizo Charter Superscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber
Eric Saxon wrote:
Berselius wrote:

No offense to all the authors of Paizo Publishing, but are there seriously ANY HEROES IN GOLARION WHATSOEVER?

I mean, holy crap! We're getting enough stories of villains, scoundrels, abominations, and desperate souls to fill an ENTIRE LIBRARY!

It looks like these guys used to be heroes and found out what the reward for heroism is. So stop flaming things you don't take the time to read.

BTW, I'm hooked and interested in where this story is going.

I've read every single one of the novels except Wizard's Mask, which is now in progress, and I've stated this same concern a number of times, though perhaps not quite as emphatically.

I understand the desire to publish gritty fiction, but every once in a while I like to feel good about what I'm reading as opposed to getting through it and going "man, I didn't like a single character in that novel" (Blood of the City, I'm looking at you) or saying "well, glad that's done with" (none of the Pathfinder novels are guilty of that, thankfully :). Sometimes when I'm reading one of these books, my girlfriend will ask me why I'm even bothering reading it!

Answer: I really like to finish what I start - and sometimes after several hundred pages (!!!) it will start to pay off (not that I'm looking at The Scar here or anything).

To make a parallel: David Drake, Ray Bradbury and Kurt Vonnegut are awesome writers, but if I did nothing but read their books, I'd probably be a depressed wreck. I can take them in small doses, but, which is why I read a lot of Robert Heinlein, David Weber, and heck, Edgar Rice Burroughs, too.


I have managed one novel, Blood of the City, and I never found myself asking when a likable character would show up. But I spend less time thinking about the writing craft and more just enjoying the story than a lot of folks, too.

Contributor

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Kairos Dawnfury wrote:

Perhaps it's because I'm younger and haven't read an many novels, but most of my experiences with stories have been angsty anti-heroes and scoundrals who become heroic in the 11th hour.

Paizo's short fiction was honestly what got me really reading novels in the past few years, so I had the opposite experience. I'd like some genuine heroes with an emphasis on the GOOD aspect of their alignment. Heroism to me involves their intentions as well as their actions.

I didn't mean to imply I didn't like this story, I merely jumped on the bandwagon. I'm hoping we end up with a Rocky like story of a shaken confidence.

I would suggest King of Chaos for you as well, and there is a lot of fantasy out there, so look for reviews. If you want to read a great series in that vein, I might suggest Elizabeth Moon's Deed of Paksenarion. I fell in love with it 25 years ago, and still have my copies.

Grand Lodge

If you want truly good guys, go for the Dragonlance Trilogy. Sturm Brightblade will be right up your alley. A clear hero and so is Flint. I've read a lot of the hero books personally, so I've got 20 years of them, to get out of my system.

To me a hero, isn't someone who's been brainwashed to be a good guy. I don't find White Knights and White Wizards to be entirely heroic, there's no sense of sacrifice being dedicated to GOOD. Going from gray to white, is more of an adventure to me as it showcases true heroism of not only overcoming villainy but also overcoming one's own pettiness and selfishness.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber; Pathfinder Comics Subscriber; Pathfinder Legends Subscriber
gbonehead wrote:
I understand the desire to publish gritty fiction, but every once in a while I like to feel good about what I'm reading as opposed to getting through it and going "man, I didn't like a single character in that novel" (Blood of the City, I'm looking at you) or saying "well, glad that's done with" (none of the Pathfinder novels are guilty of that, thankfully :). Sometimes when I'm reading one of these books, my girlfriend will ask me why I'm even bothering reading it!

:O

Threadjack w/ minor spoilers:

I LOVED Blood of the City. I read it three times.

I really liked the character of Luma. She's tragic, but she reminds me of the main character in any western movie.

I found Noole to be a really fun character. When I read Noole, his voice in my head sounded loke Paul F Thompkins' character "Frank Doyle" from The Thrilling Adventure Hour podcast.

I like Priza's sense of honor.

Hendregan is just crazy and that can be a lot of fun. I hope he turns up in Robin Laws' next Pathfinder novel. (I'm making some assumptions in that last sentence.)

All that said, I can also see and respect your point of view (and peacfully disagree). :) I don't think that my spouse would enjoy Blood of the City at all. She didn't finish The Worldwound Gambit because she didn't like the characters or all the demon stuff.

I'm glad there a new Tales novel every other month because that means that there will be books for all tastes.

;)

Grand Lodge

So, its been a week. Anyone know where the next chapter is?


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber; Pathfinder Comics Subscriber; Pathfinder Legends Subscriber

At GenCon? We may not see chapter 2 until next week.

I think that all the Paizo staff are pretty busy this week at GenCon.

Contributor

Eric Saxon wrote:
So, its been a week. Anyone know where the next chapter is?

Yep, all of the Paizo crew is pretty much here at GenCon. I think we'll have to wait for the next installment, but I think it'll be worth the wait.

Grand Lodge

Still no update, eh? :)

Senior Editor/Fiction Editor

Eric Saxon wrote:
Still no update, eh? :)

It's up! It's up! (He says while swatting at the alarm clock...)

Chapter Two of the Weeping Blade.

Senior Editor/Fiction Editor

And to everybody looking for more "good guy" heroes: Your opinion is totally valid, and there are more coming, I swear, in both the novel line and the web fiction. Stay tuned. :)

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Adventure Path Subscriber; Pathfinder Comics Subscriber

I want a great story and if that comes from reading about a dwarf that drags his cohorts into a cavern filled with vampire dark elves that eat said cohort well then all the better! :)


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Modules, Tales Subscriber; Pathfinder Comics Subscriber

"Smolley chargarlum?" is actually Kellid for "Millenium hand and shrimp."

The question mark at the end indicates that the tone of voice should go up at the end of the sentence - without it it'd mean "Millenium hand and beaker."

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