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Meet the Iconics: Seelah

Monday, December 17, 2007

Although still viewed by many theologians and traditionalists as a newcomer to the world's faiths, Iomedae the Inheritor seems poised for greatness among the divine. Certainly her numerous orders of paladins have risen swiftly to take on the vaunted role of paragon in many societies. Evangelical in their exuberance to spread word of her wisdom, Iomedae's missionaries were pivotal in the defense during the fabled Siege of Solku. They sacrificed their lives saving the town from gnoll slavers, and although none of them survived the siege, their presence lived on. Particularly in the eyes of young Seelah.

Seelah's family came to the walled town of Solku as pilgrims fleeing the atrocities of distant Geb to the distant south. Unfortunately, they traded one peril for another, and within months of their settling in Solku, the gnolls of White Canyon began their infamous pillaging. Seelah's parents were slain in the first of these raids, leaving her orphaned at the age of 14 in a strange town. She did what she must to survive on the city streets, pickpocketing and bullying and even hiring herself out as a mercenary. When a group of Iomedae's knights arrived to defend Solku, Seelah was immediately taken with their beautiful, shining armor, and within an hour she had stolen a particularly fine mithral helm with a golden bird upon its brow. Yet then, something strange happened—Seelah became overwhelmed with guilt at her theft. For days, she agonized over the act, trying (and failing) several times to pawn the helm. During the Battle of Red Hail, Seelah realized that one of the bravest knights, a woman named Acemi with hair in long braids, fought the battle without her helm. This was the woman's undoing—in holding Solku's gates, she took a mortal wound to the skull from a gnoll's flail. The woman's heroism carried the day, but that evening she died of her wound.

Wracked with guilt, Seelah approached Acemi's body as her companions prepared for her pyre. They watched silently as Seelah placed the stolen helm over the dead woman's head, and then climbed onto the pyre aside her to join her in death. The paladins were moved beyond words—they had known from the start that Seelah had stolen the helm, but Acemi had forbidden her brothers and sisters from collecting it, hoping that the helm would bring the desperate orphan enough money to survive for another few months. The knights of Iomedae took Seelah in that night. Although she has come to terms with Acemi's death, Seelah still regrets the theft that ironically brought her into Iomedae's arms. She originally came to Iomedae out of guilt, but in the past several years, that guilt has transformed into a powerful love and faith in the Inheritor.

The young paladin wears her hair in Acemi's style and is trained in the use of the longsword. In so doing, she hopes to carry on the good work that Acemi might have done had she not fallen at the Battle of Red Hail. It's the least she feels she can do to make up for a death that she allowed to happen.

Seelah debuts as a pregenerated character in volume 7 of Pathfinder and in GameMastery Module W2: River Into Darkness.

James Jacobs
Editor-in-Chief, Pathfinder

More Paizo Blog.
Tags: Iconics Meet the Iconics Paladins Portraits Seelah Wayne Reynolds

"although none of them survived the siege..."
"The knights of Iomedae took Seelah in that night."

How could they take in Seelah, if they all died in the siege? It sounds from context as if the first line is wrong.

Osirion

1 person marked this as a favorite.

Clearly the paladins of Iomedae who came in the night were all vampires, and so counted as having not survived the seige. :)


They took her in before the rest of them died, that's how I read it.

Ruyan.

PS: Funny nobody commented on the blog post in 2007...

Paizo Employee Webstore Gninja Minion

RuyanVe, the blogs were not automatically linked to their discussion threads back then. There's probably one in the archives somewhere, I think I remember gushing about it.


I'm guessing it'd be this thread.

*starts looking for gushing Liliths*


Thanks, Liz!


RuyanVe wrote:

They took her in before the rest of them died, that's how I read it.

Ruyan.

PS: Funny nobody commented on the blog post in 2007...

I think I followed a link on TV tropes' Pathfinder page. :)

I can't work out how Seelah could have been taken in and trained as a paladin if none of the Order survived the siege. I suppose she could have been taken in, THEN they all died, THEN she found some more Paladins to train her... but it doesn't say that. I think on balance the 'none survived' line does not fit with the rest of the backstory below it, and may be an error.

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Sieges are not over in a night. It could be that many more battles took place before the siege was lifted. Seelah may have started her training in that period and then found another paladin of Iomedae to continue her training.

Andoran

Pathfinder Companion Subscriber
TheInnsmouthLooker wrote:
Sieges are not over in a night. It could be that many more battles took place before the siege was lifted. Seelah may have started her training in that period and then found another paladin of Iomedae to continue her training.

That was how I read it. It seems as though this was a very lengthy siege that spanned a fair amount of time and had several "named" battles.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Knights do not necessarily equal paladins.

Regards,
Ruemere


As I am searching for picture of a Knight of Ozem falling under the CUP, I was wandering wether Seelah is one... Does Knight of Iomedae mean Knight of Ozem?


1 person marked this as a favorite.
RuyanVe wrote:
They took her in before the rest of them died, that's how I read it.

Either that or it was just the ones who were OUTSIDE the city walls who died (the ones inside the city helping to keep the gnolls out might have been the survivors). Either way, Seelah's story moves me to tears. To have such strength of conscience that she was wracked by such an enormous amount of guilt to willingly want to join Acemi in death in order to make up for what happened. How could the Iomedaeians NOT TAKE HER IN?

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