Wizard Class Preview

Monday, May 21, 2018

With Paizocon getting underway in just a few days, we wanted to round out our previews by looking at the final class that you will be able to play at the show. So, without further delay, it's time to look at the wizard!

Wizard Features

If you are building a wizard, everything starts with your key ability, Intelligence. Having a high Intelligence gives you a boost to the DCs of your spells, and it gives you more skill choices at 1st level.

At 1st level, you begin play with a spellbook containing 10 cantrips and eight 1st-level spells, giving you a wide variety of spells to draw upon when you prepare your magic each morning. Starting out, you can prepare four cantrips and two 1st-level spells each day. In addition, you also select your arcane school at 1st level, which grants you one extra spell slot of each level that you can use only to prepare a spell from your chosen school. You can compare this to the cleric, who doesn't get extra spell slots, but instead gets a narrow ability to cast extra heal or harm spells. Your school also grants you a school power that you can cast using a pool of Spell Points. Take a look at the nifty power you can pick up from choosing divination as your school. (Remember, that [[A]] code you see indicates that this is an action, and it will be a snazzy icon in the final rulebook!)

DIVINER'S SIGHT

Concentrate, Divination, Fortune

Casting [[A]] Verbal Casting

Range 30 feet; Targets one willing living creature

Duration end of your next turn or until dismissed

You glimpse into the target's future. Roll a d20. When the target attempts a Perception check, saving throw, or skill check, it can use the number you rolled instead of rolling, and the spell is dismissed. Casting it again dismisses any active diviner's sight.

Even if you don't roll so great, it might still help avoid a critical failure on a vital saving throw.

You can forgo selecting an arcane school, instead choosing to be a universalist. This grants you a bonus wizard feat and extra uses of your arcane focus.

Speaking of which, all wizards gain the ability to place some of their power into a designated item called an arcane focus. You can drain the power from that focus once per day to cast any one spell that you have already cast without spending another spell slot. Universalists get to use this ability once for each level of spell that they can cast!

As a wizard goes up in level, they gain more spells that they can cast (either one extra spell of their highest level, or two of a new level) and their proficiency at spellcasting also increases. They start as trained, but rise to the rank of legendary at 19th level.

Illustration by Wayne Reynolds

Wizard Feats

Wizards have never had too many class features to choose from to help distinguish them from one another, so when it came time to design feats for the wizard, it was a clear opportunity to add some variety to the class.

Lets start out with a few classic concepts. At 1st level, you can pick up a feat that allows you to spend your reaction to counterspell any spell someone else casts as long as you currently have that spell prepared. If that isn't to your taste, you can take a wizard feat to recruit a familiar instead. Every day, you can select a pair of abilities to give this loyal companion, some of which grant you boons as well. At high levels, your familiar can even grant you an additional spell slot, as long as it is 3 levels lower than the highest-level spell you can cast. At 8th level you can select from a series of feats that enhance the power of your arcane school, increasing your pool of Spell Points and granting you an extra spell you can cast using that pool. One of my favorites is the necromantic power called life siphon, which lets you draw some of the magic from a non-cantrip necromancy spell you cast to regain 1d8 Hit Points per level of the spell.

Not surprisingly, the wizard also has a lot of feats to choose from that modify the spells that you cast. While many of these metamagic feats will be familiar to veterans of the game, allowing you to extend the reach or widen the area of a spell, for example, others are new. Conceal Spell lets you add an action to a spell as you cast it to hide the fact that you are casting. Focus Conservation is an action you can add to any spell that you cast by draining your arcane focus, and it lets you drain your arcane focus again the next round, casting another spell as long as it is 2 levels lower than the spell you just cast. Better still, you can keep using this feat as long as you have lower-level spells to cast. For example, if you start out draining your focus to cast cone of cold (a 5th-level spell dealing a wicked 11d6 cold damage to all your enemies), you could follow it up next round with a fireball. If you use the feat again, you could drain focus again on the following round, casting any 1st-level spell you had already cast.

As a wizard rises to the highest levels of power, their feats grant them more and more options when determining how to best utilize their spells. Effortless Concentration gives you a free action at the start of each round to concentrate on a spell you have cast, freeing you up to use all 3 actions normally. Superior Focus gives you another use of your arcane focus. Quick Preparation lets you swap out spells you have already prepared in just 10 minutes. At 20th level, you can pick Spell Combination, which lets you combine two spells into one terrifying attack that you can unleash on one unfortunate foe.

Spells

One of the biggest ways you can customize your wizard is in your spell selection, so it's probably worth looking at a few signature wizard spells to see how they work. Let's start with one of the most iconic spells of them all.

MAGIC MISSILE SPELL 1

Evocation, Force

Casting [[A]] Verbal Casting or more

Range 120 feet; Targets one creature

You send a dart of force streaking toward a creature that you can see. It automatically hits and deals 1d4+1 force damage. When Casting this Spell, you can increase the casting by a Material Casting action, a Somatic Casting action, or both. For each component you add, increase the number of missiles you shoot by one. You choose the target for each missile individually.

Heightened (+2) You shoot one additional missile with each action you spend.

Magic missile shows off a couple of interesting options in the wizard's arsenal. Casting a spell can be done in a number of ways using a variable number of actions. While most of the time this is through metamagic feats, it can also come from the spell itself. Adding casting actions to magic missile gives you more missiles to throw. In addition, a wide variety of spells can be prepared using a higher-level spell slot, giving you a better effect without having to refer to an entirely different spell. (You can find out more about that in the All About Spells blog.) That means you can prepare magic missile as a 9th-level spell and spend three actions casting it for 15 missiles!

Another important aspect of picking spells for your wizard is to balance what saving throws they allow and what effects you can get depending on the results of the save. For that, let's take a look at a spell that might instantly kill a foe.

PHANTASMAL KILLER SPELL 4

Death, Emotion, Fear, Illusion, Mental

Casting [[A]] Somatic Casting, [[A]] Verbal Casting

Range 120 feet; Targets one living creature

You create a phantasmal image of the most fearsome creature imaginable to the target. Only the spell's target can see the killer, though you can see the vague shape of the illusion as it races forth to attack. The effect of the killer is based on the outcome of the target's Will saving throw.

Success The target is frightened 1.

Critical Success The target is unaffected.

Failure The target takes 8d6 mental damage and is frightened 2.

Critical Failure The target is so afraid it might instantly die. It must attempt a Fortitude saving throw; if the target fails, it is reduced to 0 Hit Points and dies. On a successful Fortitude save, the target still takes 12d6 mental damage, is fleeing until the end of its next turn, and is frightened 4.

Heightened (+1) The damage on a failure increases by 2d6 and on a critical failure by 3d6.

This spell is perfect for removing a lower-level foe from a fight, but it has the chance of greatly hampering a higher-level foe as well. The frightened condition reduces by 1 each turn, but it applies a penalty to almost all of your checks and rolls until it does. You will find interesting choices like these throughout the arcane spell list. While most will be familiar to a Pathfinder veteran, there are a lot of new spells to explore as well, from grim tendril to chromatic wall, so your wizard will be ready for anything.

Well, that wraps up our look at the wizard. If you want to give this class (or the alchemist, cleric, fighter, paladin, or rogue) a try, make sure to stop by PaizoCon (this weekend), the UK Games Expo (early June), or Origins (mid-June), as we'll be running demos during all three conventions!

Jason Bulmahn
Director of Game Design

Note: Due to PaizoCon, there will not be a Pathfinder Playtest Blog on Friday, May 25th or Monday, May 28th.

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Tags: Ezren Pathfinder Playtest Wayne Reynolds Wizards
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2 people marked this as a favorite.

Yay, wizard blog.

Seems nice


2 people marked this as a favorite.

Will there be a way to use dispel magic with the counterspell feat? Perhaps as an "Improved Counterspell?"


Cool stuff.

I like the early versatility. I'm likely to continue to focus on martial characters, though I'm hopeful with PF2 that getting a few fireballs or other basic magic won't be an exercise in frustration.


4 people marked this as a favorite.

Such a relive to see the Universalist still exist, thanks for that. Also it looks like specialization doesn't prohibit schools anymore another great thing. Overall I like it, even if I still would have preferred more spells per day.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

This looks great so far.


10 people marked this as a favorite.

I'm glad that it looks like Save or Die has been rebalanced to be overall more useful to players and less devastating against them. Though I wish this had included actual text for a couple of those feats.


3 people marked this as a favorite.

Glad to see more benefits given for the Universalist class, with the Wizard feats looking quite potent and being able to cast more spells with your spell focus. It looks like a solid choice now for those who want to be less specialized.

Dark Archive

Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber

Yes, this what we’ve been waiting to see!


1 person marked this as a favorite.

I really like the illustration for the wizard.


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Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

No opposed school, then? Well, I suppose we may see something like it in a feat. I hope so, at least.


8 people marked this as a favorite.

Does Conceal Spell hide any Spell Manifestations (if those still are a thing in PF2)?


8 people marked this as a favorite.
Xethik wrote:
No opposed school, then? Well, I suppose we may see something like it in a feat. I hope so, at least.

You want a feat that prohibits you a school?

Liberty's Edge

2 people marked this as a favorite.

Can you explain how you arrived at 15 missiles if cast as a 9th level spell? I can't figure out the math here.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

If I am understanding correctly, it seems that wizards can cast more if their limited spells per day than clerics, buy they have to draw on resources to do it? I'm cautiously optimistic about this.

I'm looking forward to seeing how the sorcerer is distinguished from the wizard now.

Silver Crusade

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I was kinda hoping that magic missile would no longer be an auto hit..


11 people marked this as a favorite.
Gunny wrote:
Can you explain how you arrived at 15 missiles if cast as a 9th level spell? I can't figure out the math here.

I think it's this: At level 1 you get 1 missile per component, so 3 if you use all three components. Every time you heighten it, you add two to the level and one missile per component. So at level 3 its 2 missiles per component, at level 5 it's 3, and level 7 it's 4, and level 9 it's 5. So if you use all three components at level 9, you get 3 * 5 = 15 missiles.


Gunny wrote:
Can you explain how you arrived at 15 missiles if cast as a 9th level spell? I can't figure out the math here.

One per action plus an additional missile per action for every two spell levels.

Three for first, third, fifth, seventh, and ninth. Five sets of three missiles.

Paizo Employee Designer

34 people marked this as a favorite.
Mats Öhrman wrote:
Does Conceal Spell hide any Spell Manifestations (if those still are a thing in PF2)?

Yes, if successful, you hide that you took the actions at all, including the spell manifestations. Obviously if a fireball shoots out of your hand after that, they're going to know something is up even if they don't think you cast a spell, so be clever with your use of spells. Something like charm where the target doesn't realize what you tried to do unless they critically succeed on the Will save is a good choice.

Silver Crusade

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Gunny wrote:
Can you explain how you arrived at 15 missiles if cast as a 9th level spell? I can't figure out the math here.

(1 missile base + (9 - 1)/2 missiles from heighten) * 3 actions

= (1 + 4) * 3
= 5 * 3
= 15 missles


3 people marked this as a favorite.

What do wizards do?


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Paizo Charter Superscriber; Pathfinder Deluxe Comics Subscriber; Pathfinder Legends Subscriber; Pathfinder Tales Subscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber
Gunny wrote:
Can you explain how you arrived at 15 missiles if cast as a 9th level spell? I can't figure out the math here.

"Heightened (+2)" means that increasing the level of the spell slot by 2 applies the listed effect which is "one additional missile with each action you spend". So, if you do this four times to increase the spell slot level by +8 (from 1st to 9th) you apply the effect four times as well, meaning four additional missiles per action. That makes up for 5 missiles per action, and if you use all 3 actions, you get 15 missiles.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

I'm excited that universalist school is getting some incentive.
I'm also really liking the versatility in choosing how many actions to apply to certain spells


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Lots of interesting tidbits in here.

Prepare cantrips? I didn't see that coming, but it makes perfect sense.

Spend an action to concentrate by default, hmm?

Question: everyone gets an arcane focus, and universalists get 1 use per spell level? Meanwhile, specialists also get an extra slot to prepare a school spell in? Does that mean universalists come out with one less spell per day, albeit with no restrictions on what spell that is?

Edit: never mind, I see you get extra uses.


This looks pretty cool. I don't normally play spellcasters, but I may have to give wizards a shot in 2e.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber
Gunny wrote:
Can you explain how you arrived at 15 missiles if cast as a 9th level spell? I can't figure out the math here.

The key entry is the following:

"Heightened (+2) You shoot one additional missile with each action you spend."

By default, you shoot one missile per action spent casting the spell. From the "Heightened" entry, you can increase the level of the spell slot used to prepare the spell by +2 to shoot one extra missile per action, and apparently you can heighten the spell as often as you like up to the maximum spell level that you have.

So, if you heighten the spell four times to 9th level (1 + 2 + 2 + 2 + 2 = 9), you can shoot four extra missiles per action, for a total of five missile per action. If you use three actions to cast the spell, that comes out to 3 x 5 = 15 missiles.


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Anybody else find it confusing that the description is written from the perspective of the caster, while the save effects suddenly without explanation are written from the perspective of the target? It makes the whole success/fail thing feel reversed. The weapon attacks weren’t so, right?


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
edduardco wrote:
Xethik wrote:
No opposed school, then? Well, I suppose we may see something like it in a feat. I hope so, at least.
You want a feat that prohibits you a school?

If it granted you the universalists ability to use their focus on each level, or something equally powerful, then maybe.

Paizo Employee Designer

11 people marked this as a favorite.
Stone Dog wrote:

If I am understanding correctly, it seems that wizards can cast more if their limited spells per day than clerics, buy they have to draw on resources to do it? I'm cautiously optimistic about this.

I'm looking forward to seeing how the sorcerer is distinguished from the wizard now.

Cleric spells:

Cantrips
Powers
3 per level slots
a huge number (possibly as many as 6 at 1st level while still maxing Wisdom) of max-spell-level heal or harm spells

Wizard spells:

Cantrips
Powers (if you do not like powers, the universalist, and only the universalist, has extreme flexibility even to the point of ditching them for more metamagic or other options)
3+1 per level slots (either the +1 per level is chosen on the fly from all 3 of your other options as a universalist, or it's locked into your specialty school but you get another 1 spell from arcane bond)


6 people marked this as a favorite.

Looks pretty neat! I like the option of counterspelling as a reaction, it might make people actually use it.

I also really like the new rendition of Phantasmal Killer and other Save-or-Die spells.

I wonder how Sorcerers are going to work in contrast. I always liked the focused theme a little more on them.

AnimatedPaper wrote:
Prepare cantrips? I didn't see that coming, but it makes perfect sense.

You always had to prepare cantrips, you could just cast them as many times as you want once you had them prepared. I assume it works the same way here.


4 people marked this as a favorite.

I really like how the spells seem to be avoiding the "save or suck" conditions that many spells in PF1 suffered from. They made certain spells "undesirable", as characters that made their saving throw would render your spell effectively wasted.


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Why are the ranges on the spells static? Do they no longer change with caster level? And if they don't these seem rather short for what was PF1 medium range spells.


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Well, at least the wizard gets more spells per day than the cleric, one way or another.

You made the universalist just directly better than a specialist, because their bonus spell slots per day from the focus are far more flexible than the specialist slots. It comes down to the specialist only gets 1 extra spell per day over the universalist which is not as good as the universalist's huge flexibility, and the school power which is probably not going to be as good as some of the feat options. Not particularly happy with that.

The feats look good. Some are expected, others are a little better than expected. Familiars sound like they'll be more fun this time and won't get forgotten as much. Happy to see Conceal Spell, and that Focus Conservation looks pretty great. The high level ones also look awesome... certainly better than a 14th level Fighter feat letting them add their shield to a Reflex save one time. ;3

Magic Missile should probably be Heighten 1 rather than Heighten 2. No one will cast a Magic Missile in a 9th level slot, when that works out to only being as good as a 5th level spell and nowhere comparable to higher level magic.

Phantasmal Killer is solidly designed.

Overall the Wizard looks okay on balance except for the part where Universalists are even more terrifyingly powerful than before instead of less. What the heck.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Any chance of an arcane healing for wizards in PF2? I can see why you would make it worse than cleric healing or something like that but it always seemed odd to me that masters of arcane lore can't figure out arcane healing when the bard can.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Only 2 spells shown! :C I love the gradual effects!


Pathfinder Starfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Mark Seifter wrote:
Mats Öhrman wrote:
Does Conceal Spell hide any Spell Manifestations (if those still are a thing in PF2)?
Yes, if successful, you hide that you took the actions at all, including the spell manifestations. Obviously if a fireball shoots out of your hand after that, they're going to know something is up even if they don't think you cast a spell, so be clever with your use of spells. Something like charm where the target doesn't realize what you tried to do unless they critically succeed on the Will save is a good choice.

Of course, there's also inherent worth in having the panache to be talking to someone, casually flick your wrist and fry them without so much as a finger wiggle. :)

Paizo Employee Director of Game Design

29 people marked this as a favorite.
Fuzzypaws wrote:

Magic Missile should probably be Heighten 1 rather than Heighten 2. No one will cast a Magic Missile in a 9th level slot, when that works out to only being as good as a 5th level spell and nowhere comparable to higher level magic.

You are right, that 9th level spell is going to be better than a 9th level magic missile, but that is the point. It is usually not the best option, but there are circumstances where it will be.

I think we intentionally made sure that the heightened spells were not obviously better than spells of that level. They are meant to be options to help fill out your tool kit in the right scenario. We want you to make choices with your spells, not just automatically prepare the "best" one all the time.

And I would probably prep that higher level magic missile if I knew I was facing down a powerful ghost....


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EldritchWeaver wrote:
Mats Öhrman wrote:
Does Conceal Spell hide any Spell Manifestations (if those still are a thing in PF2)?
If it doesn't then it becomes useless compared to silent + stilled.

Since Silent and Still are not mentioned, perhaps Conceal replaces both of those. That would be a boon...

Paizo Employee Designer

20 people marked this as a favorite.
Fuzzypaws wrote:

Well, at least the wizard gets more spells per day than the cleric, one way or another.

You made the universalist just directly better than a specialist, because their bonus spell slots per day from the focus are far more flexible than the specialist slots. It comes down to the specialist only gets 1 extra spell per day over the universalist which is not as good as the universalist's huge flexibility, and the school power which is probably not going to be as good as some of the feat options. Not particularly happy with that.

The Universalist is pretty great (whereas in PF1 it was definitely a poor choice compared to a specialist), but I don't think it's far and away better than the specialist because of an interesting nuance of how the focus spells work.

Compare a universalist who prepared fireball, haste, and dispel magic to a transmuter, evoker, illusionist, or abjurer who prepared fireball, haste, dispel magic, and invisibility sphere. If the adventure needs either an extra fireball, an extra haste, or an extra dispel magic, the universalist is set, but if the adventure needed the invisibility sphere, the specialist had the advantage. Getting to pick from a list of three to double is definitely better than adding a fourth (particularly if the specialist ever decides to double up), but then the specialist gets that extra spell on top. I feel that they are pretty comparable options.

Liberty's Edge

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Thanks for clarifying the math. Now I have another question on actions. You can use verbal, somatic and material to add to the power of a spell - I get that. Will each spell have a descriptor of what the material component will be? Or will we assume that material components are just some sort of arcane focus? I don't need the GM saying "oops, you forgot to buy your widget doodad - so you can only use 2 actions not three for your spell."


Fuzzypaws wrote:


You made the universalist just directly better than a specialist, because their bonus spell slots per day from the focus are far more flexible than the specialist slots. It comes down to the specialist only gets 1 extra spell per day over the universalist which is not as good as the universalist's huge flexibility, and the school power which is probably not going to be as good as some of the feat options. Not particularly happy with that.

Overall the Wizard looks okay on balance except for the part where Universalists are even more terrifyingly powerful than before instead of less. What the heck.

You are forgetting the Universalist doesn't get a school based Power (and it is hinted in the blog that you can invest more into these with feats.) Now the divination one isn't particularly scary, but it seems to only take one Spell Point to cast.

I'm guessing there will be other factors too. I wouldn't be surprised if proficiency was broken down by spell school and Universalists lag behind. (Perhaps universalists end up with Master in all, while specialists get Legendary in one and Expert at the rest.)


11 people marked this as a favorite.

So: They stripped away what few class features wizard's had and then gave them back as class feats.

They seriously nerfed Phantasmal Killer, which now only forces the fortitude save if the will save is a critical failure.

Fear now only lasts 1 round/tier (?), not sure if this will apply to other sources of fear, but is phrased as a general mechanic.

Number of starting spells is decoupled from intelligence (though the number is increased). Gaining INT later in the campaign will no longer grant additional free spells.

The number of new spells wizards get as they level is decreased (10, 1, 2, 1, 2, 1, etc.) The level of the spells gained is not specified (Highest level or new level).

Arcane Bond items no longer allow the wizard to cast any spell the wizard knows. They now function more like the Magus' Spell Recall.


6 people marked this as a favorite.

Thank you,Mark! I appreciate your help as always.

On the subject of the spell effects, it feels like if a spell is an attack rolled by the caster (acid arrow?) then the effects are going to be from the casters perspective. If the spell is something the target has to defend against, then the effects are going to be from the targets perspective.

What I'd rather see in layout though is the spectrum of results from one end to the other. What do we have now, success, critical success, failure, then critical failure? I'd sooner see critical success, success, failure, then critical failure.


5 people marked this as a favorite.
Fuzzypaws wrote:

Well, at least the wizard gets more spells per day than the cleric, one way or another.

You made the universalist just directly better than a specialist, because their bonus spell slots per day from the focus are far more flexible than the specialist slots. It comes down to the specialist only gets 1 extra spell per day over the universalist which is not as good as the universalist's huge flexibility, and the school power which is probably not going to be as good as some of the feat options. Not particularly happy with that.

The feats look good. Some are expected, others are a little better than expected. Familiars sound like they'll be more fun this time and won't get forgotten as much. Happy to see Conceal Spell, and that Focus Conservation looks pretty great. The high level ones also look awesome... certainly better than a 14th level Fighter feat letting them add their shield to a Reflex save one time. ;3

Magic Missile should probably be Heighten 1 rather than Heighten 2. No one will cast a Magic Missile in a 9th level slot, when that works out to only being as good as a 5th level spell and nowhere comparable to higher level magic.

Phantasmal Killer is solidly designed.

Overall the Wizard looks okay on balance except for the part where Universalists are even more terrifyingly powerful than before instead of less. What the heck.

Not as FLexible. Arcane Bond is now a pearl of power instead of ANY spell. So they have to use the same spells over and over. Specialists can prepare wider variety.

----------------

So how do Wizards learn new spells? I pray to Asmodeus that it's identical to 1e.


quirthanon wrote:
Why are the ranges on the spells static? Do they no longer change with caster level? And if they don't these seem rather short for what was PF1 medium range spells.

Static range is probably for simplification, the 120' cap was probably chosen because it's a sweet spot that at maximum range makes you unable to be reached in melee on your victim's next turn, but all bets are off after that.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Love the school power, I'm imagining the wizard using the Diviner's Sight power three times in the same turn to fortify his team as they prepare to charge a mummy or basilisk.

Will we rearrange the spell saves so that is lists Critical Success, Success, Failure, Critical Failure?

I'm very excited about the gradient of actions available with the three action system and the variable action spells/abilities.


19 people marked this as a favorite.
Starfinder Charter Superscriber

I'm not a fan of counterspell requiring you to have the spell that you're countering prepared. That seems like a recipe for just never countering anything at all (especially when the number of spells in the game grows as it eventually will). I had been looking forward to getting a cool and flavorful reaction for the wizard, and now it seems like it's not going to be anywhere near as useful as I'd hoped :(

Other than that, I like most of this. I'd still prefer arcanist style casting, but that can wait for the inevitable surveys ;-)


7 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Cards, Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

This looks good:
* 3 spell slots per level, +1 for specialists
* an extra spell from your focus
* cool metamagic options (which we still need to know more about) including an unambiguously worded conceal spell option (for all those wizard spies and diplomats!)
* familiars as an option through feats, with hints at added familiar-linked powers

I know it was necessary to rein in spellcasters, to reduce the CMD. But it looks frankly like our pals at Paizo managed to give us just enough gravy to soften the blow. It's still going to be great fun to be a wizard, even if we'll have slightly fewer spells and even if there will be slightly fewer feat- and trait-links shenanigans we can pull off. (and a good thing, too!)

Keep up the good work, and have fun at Paizocon (I'm so jealous of those who can go!)

Just one point of criticism: saves should be listed ether from worst to best or vice-versa. Too confusing otherwise.

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