Attack the Stat Block

Friday, May 18, 2018

In Monday's monster blog, Mark told you about some of the changes we made to monsters to make them more engaging and easy to run. So how did we turn all that into something you can use? Well, we put a lot of thought into making a new monster stat block that would be more concise, while remaining flexible enough that we can still keep a similar level of complexity for some of our most powerful and iconic monsters.

But let's start small. Well... big, but also small. You'll see.

So Now There's Ogres, Okay?

Oh no... what's that smell? It's like a gym bag ate roadkill!

Ogre Creature 3

Chaotic, Evil, Giant, Humanoid, Large

Perception +5, darkvision

Languages Giant

Skills +1; Acrobatics +4, Athletics +9

Str +5, Dex -1, Con +2, Int -2, Wis +0, Cha -2

Items hide armor, 6 javelins, ogre hook


AC 16, TAC 14; Fort +8, Ref +3, Will +5

HP 60


Speed 25 feet

[[A]] Melee ogre hook +10 (deadly 1d10, reach 10 feet, trip), Damage 1d10+7 piercing

[[A]] Ranged javelin +8 (thrown 30 feet), Damage 1d6+7

Ah, of course. It's an ogre! This is an example of one of the simplest stat blocks in the playtest. Ogres are big bruisers, and they don't have a whole lot of special actions to use. They play a role as big challenges for low-level groups and in groups as minions for higher-level threats, so having them be simple makes plenty of sense for how they're used in the game. You might notice that this stat block is shorter than a Pathfinder First Edition stat block. We think this will give us more room for other text in our bestiaries and adventures. Some elements went away because of rules simplifications, while other pieces of information, like organization and environment, will appear in the monster's text instead of in the stat block.

We don’t have art of ogres or redcaps yet, but check out this illustration by Wayne Reynolds of a bugbear!

Quick reminder: the [[A]] symbol is code for "action," and it will have a special icon in the actual Pathfinder Playtest Rulebook and other products. You'll also see an [[R]] later to represent a reaction.

You can see how a stat block leads off with the creature's name and level, followed by its traits. These traits include its alignment and size. The top section of the stat block continues with the first stats you'll typically use, since you'll be determining whether the PCs and monsters can see one another (requiring you to use Perception), or the party might start out with an interaction (meaning you'll use the monster's languages and skills). The skills entry first lists a number you can use (in addition to the relevant ability modifier) for any skills the monster doesn't have listed, followed by a list of all the skills the monster has a different modifier for. So if you needed to roll an Acrobatics check for the ogre, you'll roll 1d20 and add 4, which is much better than its base modifier plus its Dex modifier (a total of +0).

You'll also notice the monster gives just its ability score modifiers instead of scores. This lets you make calculations more quickly, and since monsters don't increase their scores the same way PCs do, listing those is unnecessary. Monsters with items also list those up top.

There's a line to show where the monster's defenses start. Our ogre's pretty straightforward, with just ACs, saves, and Hit Points.

The next line separates the statistics and actions the monster can use on its turn. Here, that's Speed and the ogre's Strikes: an ogre hook and javelins! Even though the ogre doesn't have any special actions, it does have some special options due to its ogre hook. In parentheses, you can see the ogre hook's traits: deadly 1d10 (making it deal 1d10 more damage on a critical hit—ow!), a reach of 10 feet (letting the ogre attack past the first space), and trip (which lets the ogre trip using its hook instead of its body). Just as in Pathfinder First Edition, the reach comes from the ogre's size—the hook itself isn't long enough to increase reach.

So you can see the stat block is organized so that you're looking at the middle section when it's not the monster's turn, and at the bottom section on its turn. We think that will make it easier to use at the table, but we'd love to hear your feedback as you run these monsters during the playtest!

Blood and Boots

So how about a stat block that has a bit more going on? Here's a redcap: the nasty, brutal little fey with oversized scythes. This is a moderately complex monster. We won't be showing you any liches or pit fiends today, but the redcap will demonstrate how we present a few special abilities.

Redcap Creature 5

Evil, Fey, Small

Perception +10, low-light vision

Languages Aklo, Common, Giant, Sylvan

Skills +5; Acrobatics +13, Athletics +13, Deception +13, Intimidation +11, Nature +11, Stealth +13

Str +4, Dex +4, Con +4, Int +3, Wis +1, Cha +2

Items red cap, expert Medium scythe, iron boots

Red Cap (arcane, necromancy) A redcap's shapeless woolen hat is dyed with the blood of its victims. If the redcap loses its cap, it no longer benefits from fast healing and takes a -4 conditional penalty to its damage rolls. It can create a new cap in 10 minutes, but that cap doesn't grant its powers until the redcap has turned it red with Blood Soak. A cap has no benefit for creatures other than redcaps.


AC 20, TAC 19; Fort +8, Ref +11, Will +9

HP 55, fast healing 10; Weaknesses cold iron 5, irreligious

Irreligious (emotion, fear, mental) If a redcap sees a creature brandish a holy symbol of a good deity or use one for the Material Casting of a divine spell, the redcap must attempt a DC 17 Will save. On a failure, the redcap is frightened 4 and fleeing for 1 round; on a success, it's frightened 2; on a critical success, it's unaffected. To brandish a holy symbol, a creature must Interact to brandish it for 1 round (similar to Raising a Shield). Once a redcap has to attempt a save against a brandished holy symbol, it is bolstered against brandished holy symbols for the next 10 minutes.


Speed 50 feet

[[A]] Melee scythe +13 (deadly 1d10, trip), Damage 2d10+4 slashing
boot +13 (agile, versatile B), Damage 2d4+8 piercing

[[A]] Blood Soak (manipulate) The redcap dips its cap in the blood of a slain foe. The foe must have died in the last minute, and the redcap must have helped kill it. The redcap gains a +4 conditional bonus on damage rolls for 1 minute.

[[R]] Deadly Cleave

Trigger The redcap drops a creature to 0 Hit Points with a scythe Strike.

Effect The redcap makes another scythe Strike against a different creature, using the same multiple attack penalty as the scythe Strike that triggered this reaction. This counts toward its multiple attack penalty.

[[A]] Stomp The redcap Strides up to half its Speed and makes a boot Strike at any point during that movement. If the boot Strike hits a prone creature, it deals an extra 2d6 persistent bleed damage.

You can see here that the redcap has an ability to represent its blood-soaked hat, and that appears in the top section because it affects all of its statistics. You'll also notice the weakness to cold iron that comes from being a fey creature. One of the nice things about the new system of building monsters is that we can just give monsters the statistics we want them to have instead of sometimes building them in strange ways to get their statistics to be good. For instance, in Pathfinder First Edition, a fey might have had far more Hit Dice than expected to get its statistics high enough, which led to odd results from abilities that counted Hit Dice. Now, the redcap gets statistics that are suitable for its level and how it's used.

You can see the Irreligious ability is an example of a special ability that will come up when it's not the monster's turn. A redcap can be scared off by symbols of divinity!

In the bottom section, you see two special actions and a reaction. The reaction appears down here because the trigger is most likely to occur during the recap's own turn. You'll also see how some of the basic actions of the game end up being used in other actions. For instance, Stomp tells you that the redcap uses Stride and Strike. An ability like this lets you know any ways in which these actions operate differently than using them normally.

Spell It Out

How about just one more example for today? Let's look at how innate spells work. These are much like spell-like abilities from Pathfinder First Edition, but they function more like spells than they used to. The only difference between these and other spells is that the number of times the monster can cast them is based on the monster itself rather than on a spellcasting class. Innate spell entries look much like prepared spells, with a couple extra categories of usability. Here are some we stole from the efreeti:

Innate Arcane Spells DC 22, attack +17; Constant detect magic; 5th illusory object; 4th gaseous form, invisibility (×2); At Will plane shift (7th, to Elemental Planes, Astral Plane, or Material Plane only); Cantrips produce flame (4th)

The spell DC is listed right there, along with the attack bonus for touch attacks since the efreeti has produce flame. Illusory object is presented the same way a prepared 5th-level spell would be, as are gaseous form and the two spell slots of invisibility. Anything that doesn't come in a level entry is cast at its lowest level unless a level appears in parentheses. You can see that happening with the produce flame cantrip, which the efreeti casts as a 4th-level spell. Its detect magic is level 1, but that's a constant ability that functions all the time for the efreeti. The other special way a creature can use innate spells is with at-will spells. These are spells the monster can cast as many times as it wants even though they aren't normally cantrips. The efreeti can cast plane shift any number of times, but the parentheses tell you that it's the 7th-level version and that it can go only to certain planes.

What do you think of this take on monster presentation? Do you think it'll be easy to use these stat blocks in your game?

Logan Bonner
Designer

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Tags: Pathfinder Playtest Wayne Reynolds
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Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Pathfinder Card Game, Class Deck Subscriber

Cool!


Hrm...

+10 to attack on a CR 3.

Meaning you need AC 19 to reduce chance to hit to 50%

Using the value of a chain shirt, the only armor we have stats on, at +2, this means:

Assuming Dex 16 for a +3, and expert armor by 3 - With masterwork/expert quality on said armor...

3 (level) +1 (expert) +2 (armor) +1 (expert quality) +3 +10 base we can get it to a 45% hit chance...

Not bad...

Add a +2 for a shield and we can further drop it to a 35%

So a little higher than a 1 in 3 chance of hitting.

(I used a higher dex to supplant for not having any better armor examples)


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Looks good overall! Hm...

I think size modifiers are still a thing, judging from stuff like the Redcap having 20 AC despite level 5 + 4 Dex with no armor. Here's hoping! I didn't want the oversimplification of size modifiers being removed.

Speaking of, I'd be happier if where that AC came from was actually spelled out in parenthesis. Would make it a LOT easier to tweak and modify the creature with different equipment or stats, because if it's just a flat unexplained number like in 4E, I don't know if it is /actually/ playing by the rules or is just being given an arbitrary number based on its level.

I hope the Action and Reaction symbols are distinct at a glance, even in low light. The symbols in the Starfinder Alien Archive book can be a little muddy and indistinct.

Nice to see relevant tags in parenthesis on abilities like Irreligious. Also, it looks like "Bolstered" is a new positive base condition in the game.

I like the Reaction being listed where it's most likely to be used. I also like the relevant base actions (Stride and Strike) being explicitly called out as part of the Stomp meta-action description.

I like the presentation for the spell-like abilities. It's important for spell level to be listed with all the new scaling spells, and that's good that you already accounted for it.

I'm pleased and I want to see more. Monsters were what got me into the hobby in the first place, I read the Monstrous Manual as a kid before I ever touched the Player's Handbook. :)


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Interesting rundown. I'll have to use it in play to see if it's more useful, and getting used to it will take some time... but I definitely agree that simply giving the monster the attributes it needs is good.


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Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Pathfinder Pawns Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber; Starfinder Superscriber

So a few questions from the red cap block:

Is "bolstered" the new term of art for "immune to effect for the next 24 hours"? Or does it mean they get a bonus to later saves? or what?

The red-cap first action appears to list both its scythe and its boot on the same line, does that mean it makes both attacks when spending one action? Or is it one or the other? [Post blog edit with the two attacks on two lines, but still only one action glyph. The original question still remains.]

(less general purpose), but it seems likely that the interaction of the red cap ability and the blood soak, could cause problems. Is it a binary condition or a tertiary condition:
a) no hat (-4), blood soaked hat (+0, default stat line).
b) no hat (-4), blood soaked hat(+0, default stat line), recently soaked hat (+4 over default stat line)


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Looks good, thanks!

Seems odd to list the 10 ft reach in the weapon specifically, if it's because of the creature's size.
Makes it harder to figure out if/when they pick up other weapons during a fight -- is the reach because of size or the weapon itself? What if the weapon itself provides (extra) reach? etc...


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Fuzzypaws wrote:
I hope the Action and Reaction symbols are distinct at a glance, even in low light. The symbols in the Starfinder Alien Archive book can be a little muddy and indistinct.

This x100. It cannot be stressed enough that if one cannot pick out the symbols they aren't useful.

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Pathfinder Card Game Subscriber; Pathfinder Comics Subscriber

"...it is bolstered against brandished holy symbols for the next 10 minutes."

Doesn't sound like it has a specific time limit, given that the 10 minute duration is mentioned.


Pathfinder Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Roleplaying Guild Subscriber

Hmm looks very similar to how Starfinders Monsters are done. thats both a good and bad thing. having generated them as a GM they are much easier to do but I did love the old granular way of building them.


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Pathfinder Starfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Is there a reason initiative isn't in these blocks? I want that front and center, and maybe highlighted, because it's always the first thing I need to know.

Liberty's Edge

I like it! The formatting is very nice and I'm a big fan of the way abilities seem to work.

I am...we'll call it concerned about how very good the Redcap is at skills. A 5th level PC seems to max out at +11 in skills, maybe +13 with a Master Quality item, and only has Stat Mod +3 on untrained skills. They certainly can't get the +11 to a skill beyond their stat mod (which is what the Redcap has in Deception).

In short, the Redcap has the skills of a 7th level creature as well as good stats and a miscellaneous +4 to Deception beyond the Cha+7 that would grant. If Level+2 for skills is the high end for Monster Skills (and used to reflect the previous edition's 'Fey have lots of HD and thus good skills' in this case), I'm mostly on board...but Redcaps were never the highest skill Fey, and I'm really worried about that 'Beyond Legendary' level of Deception, as it implies that monster Ability Scores may not mean what they (IMO) should. Nature could also be an issue if Wis based for most of the same reasons.

Of course, it's possible the Redcap Deception is just a mistake, since all the other skills listed are within proper amounts of the relevant stat (well, plus Master level in the skill, which is reasonable enough).

Paizo Employee Designer

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dysartes wrote:
Probably just a typo in the blog, but you need something between slashing and boot in the Redcap's Melee line - I know I read it a few times as "slashing boot", which admittedly sounded interesting...

Yeah, that's a typo. Should have a line break there.


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Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

So, first thing that jumps out to me is that it looks like ability damage is gone? If enemies have no score, then attacking the ability seems like a thing of the past... which I will not deny. I am sad to see go.

It's nice having other options to go after.

Liberty's Edge

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DocShock wrote:
Is there a reason initiative isn't in these blocks? I want that front and center, and maybe highlighted, because it's always the first thing I need to know.

Initiative doesn't exist in PF2. You use Perception by default, or a particular skill based on what they were doing.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

There are some nice features here. I like the fact bonuses are included for the stats... but in this case, why not just have this for all stats, including on Character Sheets? Instead of a written stat of 10/12/14/16 etc., provide people with the bonus for the stat? And a Stat Increase would give an added +1 to the stats being boosted?

This would simplify things significantly, and would also mean penalties are not limited to -5 for when a stat is reduced to 1.


So throwing uses Strength on attack rolls?


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This feels unpleasantly like (the thankfully optional) simple monster creation from PF1, or PF2 monsters entirely. Which is not fun to use or look at.

And how are TAC, AC, saves, and hp computed on monsters? Is there a formula? PLEASE don't let it be arbitrary! (I hate the arbitrariness of quick/simple monster creation; it's use as the main method)

Please, let it be possible to reverse-engineer monsters to better understand them (and modify them more precisely). What I see doesn't allow that.

Also, what's skills +1 or skills +5?


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That bugbear looks really cool. Rocking the skull face lip removal. The Handy Snack™ chew toy and ye olde nail bat really tie together the matted fur and rotting ear necklace. I can practically smell the old blood and poor hygiene. Awesome job, Wayne.

So, how did the ogre get it's damage bonuses up past it's strength? I'm trying to parse that, but I'm probably missing something.

Paizo Employee Designer

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NielsenE wrote:
Is "bolstered" the new term of art for "immune to effect for the next 24 hours"?

You guessed it!

Liberty's Edge

John Ryan 783 wrote:

So, first thing that jumps out to me is that it looks like ability damage is gone? If enemies have no score, then attacking the ability seems like a thing of the past... which I will not deny. I am sad to see go.

It's nice having other options to go after.

This is both true and misleading. Instead of Ability Damage there are conditions. Every level of the Enfeebled condition, for example, gives you a -1 on all Str-based stuff (laid out specifically). Shadows can inflict Enfeebled conditions when they hit you.

So it's technically gone, but still available in practice.


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Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Castilliano wrote:
So throwing uses Strength on attack rolls?

I don't think it really goes off of anything. I think it's just what the designer wants it to be. The ogre has +5 mod on str. +10 to hit with his ogre hook, +8 with his javelin and does 7 static damage with each. No current understanding of the math makes all that add up.

Liberty's Edge

John Ryan 783 wrote:
Castilliano wrote:
So throwing uses Strength on attack rolls?
I don't think it really goes off of anything. I think it's just what the designer wants it to be. The ogre has +5 mod on str. +10 to hit with his ogre hook, +8 with his javelin and does 7 static damage with each. No current understanding of the math makes all that add up.

That's not necessarily true. A flat +2 on their main attack only would neatly mimic a 3rd level Fighter's +2 with their weapon of choice for a 3rd level brute. And that'd make the math perfect.

So yeah, I bet thrown weapons are Str.

Scarab Sages

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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

For something that takes 2 actions are we going to see a description like:

[[A]][[A]] Skewering Death The dire stirge makes a single strike that targets all targets within a 15 ft. line dealing proboscis damage and causing each target to bleed for 1d8 damage. The dire stirge gains hit points equal to any bleed damage inflicted this way.


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A lot more clean and compact than PF1, obviously there was a lot of thought put into this. Well done. I note CMB and CMD are gone, as expected. Also gone are initiative modifier (thanks to the new initiative system), flat-footed AC, BAB, space (I guess because it's inherent in the creature's size), and feats. All of these are very welcome simplifications. Sure, it was cool that monsters could have tons of feats in PF1, that allowed for great customization. But, let's face it, most of the time as a DM I forget half of them. I'm glad if I remember to use Power Attack and Cleave, but beyond that it really requires extra-strong preparation if you're running a complex fight.

The entry for spells is also great and compact. I won't miss the ability to use character's rules on monsters: While great in theory, in practice it's just too heavy to handle. So... Two thumbs up!


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John Ryan 783 wrote:
Castilliano wrote:
So throwing uses Strength on attack rolls?
I don't think it really goes off of anything. I think it's just what the designer wants it to be. The ogre has +5 mod on str. +10 to hit with his ogre hook, +8 with his javelin and does 7 static damage with each. No current understanding of the math makes all that add up.

That's a good question -- does the math still "add up"?

I like the idea of not having to be X HD to get skills (etc) as high as you'd like (which meant automatically Y hit points and Z BAB -- even if you didn't want them that high).
But how do you keep it flexible and still follow some ruleset to estimate challenge, etc?
Maybe some type of point buy for things per monster "level"? More of something means less of everything else?


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Pathfinder Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber
1of1 wrote:

That bugbear looks really cool. Rocking the skull face lip removal. The Handy Snack™ chew toy and ye olde nail bat really tie together the matted fur and rotting ear necklace. I can practically smell the old blood and poor hygiene. Awesome job, Wayne.

So, how did the ogre get it's damage bonuses up past it's strength? I'm trying to parse that, but I'm probably missing something.

I am not sure that any of the ogre's stats are directly related to ability scores at all. For example, the gap between Acrobatics and Athletics for the ogre does not match the gap between Dex and Str at all.


So just so I am clear it is one action to use the scythe and the "slashing boot" attack combo?


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the blog...meh.
but that illustration, it's like a gremlin on super-steroids...and not in a good way.


I’m curious how the Lore (knowledge) skill would work in giving what you know about the creature?

For example:
If you successfully identified the Oger what would you know?

What would you know if you critically succeed in identifying the Red Cap?


John Ryan 783 wrote:
Castilliano wrote:
So throwing uses Strength on attack rolls?
I don't think it really goes off of anything. I think it's just what the designer wants it to be. The ogre has +5 mod on str. +10 to hit with his ogre hook, +8 with his javelin and does 7 static damage with each. No current understanding of the math makes all that add up.

While I expect much of the back-end math is different, I think they are going to be working on a similar philosophy as they did with Pathfinder Unchained and Starfinder, which is: Monsters/NPCs work off of different math than PCs do.

This has many merits in that it is super easy to homebrew/create your own monsters. It also makes it easier for Paizo and other 3PP folks make monsters and stuff for adventures and what have you.

However, it does make it a bit harder for consumers to double check math on published material (especially early SFS scenarios), until the Alien Archive came out.


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Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Pathfinder Pawns Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber; Starfinder Superscriber
Logan Bonner wrote:
NielsenE wrote:
Is "bolstered" the new term of art for "immune to effect for the next 24 hours"?
You guessed it!

Can you talk about why you choose that word? "immune to ..." sounded unambiguous, while bolstered to me sounds more like "gets a bonus on future checks". It doesn't seem to be saving word count (since you still are calling out the duration of the effect.)

Liberty's Edge

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Dreamer3333 wrote:
That's a good question -- does the math still "add up"?

I hope so.

Dreamer3333 wrote:

I like the idea of not having to be X HD to get skills (etc) as high as you'd like (which meant automatically Y hit points and Z BAB -- even if you didn't want them that high).

But how do you keep it flexible and still follow some ruleset to estimate challenge, etc?
Maybe some type of point buy for things per monster "level"? More of something means less of everything else?

I suspect options off a list are involved more than point buy.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Attacks at the bottom of the statblock and equipment and skills at the top is going to take a lot of getting used to, but that's to be expected with any format change.

I quite like that you just show the modifiers rather than ability scores. Odd ability score numbers were seldom relevant, and most if not all of those cases appear to not be applicable to PF2 monsters anyways. I was basically always subconsciously substituting the ability score with modifier, so not having to do that mental math is helpful plus more intuitive to newer players.

I'm not a fan of alignment being lumped in with subtypes. In PF1 there was a big difference between a creature with an evil alignment and one with an evil subtype, and I don't expect that this distinction is going away.

Question: are the traits listed in alphabetical order, or in order of alignment / subtype / size? I can't tell which it is since it just so happens that both orderings give the same result in these two cases.

Liberty's Edge

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I think I would want to see some baseline proficiency for attacks (and HP) to assist scaling things up or switching their gear, but overall I like the presentation. The Redcap block is quite promising.

I find the alignemnt in the traits harder to read. The classic alignment abbreviation alongside types/subtypes was a lot easier to see and identify.

Showing just ability bonuses is good. It's cool seeing some of the huge numbers of outsiders and dragons but also just made stat blocks annoying to look at and they can still be reverse engineered.


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Has anything been mentioned yet for knowledge rolls on monsters? Will that wind up being laid out in the fluff for each monster?


I wonder how Level/CR is determined now. I guess the flexibility of assigning whatever you want is nice but I'm concerned of how well that integrates to a system based on levels.


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james014Aura wrote:


Also, what's skills +1 or skills +5?
blog wrote:
The skills entry first lists a number you can use (in addition to the relevant ability modifier) for any skills the monster doesn't have listed, followed by a list of all the skills the monster has a different modifier for.

It's the number for all other skills not specifically listed

Liberty's Edge

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David knott 242 wrote:
I am not sure that any of the ogre's stats are directly related to ability scores at all. For example, the gap between Acrobatics and Athletics for the ogre does not match the gap between Dex and Str at all.

I'd actually guess the damage is just 1.5x Str. That makes sense for the Ogre Hook and can make sense with the javelin depending on how thrown weapons work. Indeed, the fact that the Ogre gets this and the Redcap doesn't argues for it being a special ability purchasable at some point rather than the default for two-handed weapons.

And the gap actually could make sense. A Master level of Acrobatics and Expert Level of Athletics would result in exactly the skills shown.

Harrowed Wizard wrote:

While I expect much of the back-end math is different, I think they are going to be working on a similar philosophy as they did with Pathfinder Unchained and Starfinder, which is: Monsters/NPCs work off of different math than PCs do.

This has many merits in that it is super easy to homebrew/create your own monsters. It also makes it easier for Paizo and other 3PP folks make monsters and stuff for adventures and what have you.

However, it does make it a bit harder for consumers to double check math on published material (especially early SFS scenarios), until the Alien Archive came out.

I'm sure some of the back end math is different. But it doesn't need to be nearly as different as Starfinder or Unchained simply because of the ability to add +Level to just about everything.


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I like the organizational structure of: 1) things you need to know immediately; 2) things your need to know on the players' turns; 3) things you need to know on monster's turn. Having everything sorted like that should make it easy to find relevant information quickly and efficiently, I think.

I've been trying to work out the ogre's math, and I think it works if you assume that by virtue of being a large creature it gets a flat +2 bonus to melee attacks and strength-based damage. This would mean that the javelin is indeed using strength for the attack roll, but doesn't get the bonus to attack because it isn't a melee weapon, but does get the bonus to damage because that's strength based. Is this guess on the mark?


Pathfinder Starfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I love the simplified stat blocks, but will there be simplified templates as well to add to these if we want a beefier ogre?

What about template options to really beef up a monster without adding classes?

Liberty's Edge

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Leedwashere wrote:
I've been trying to work out the ogre's math, and I think it works if you assume that by virtue of being a large creature it gets a flat +2 bonus to melee attacks and strength-based damage. This would mean that the javelin is indeed using strength for the attack roll, but doesn't get the bonus to attack because it isn't a melee weapon, but does get the bonus to damage because that's strength based. Is this guess on the mark?

This guess is also plausible. We'll need more data to see.


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The good:

Ability Modifiers instead of Ability Scores. That makes tweaking monsters a lot easier. (Why wasn't this done for PCs?)

The bad:

I'd really like to see where the numbers for AC, TAC, etc. come from. It makes tweaking stats easier.

Overall no HUGE complaints, except...

I am starting to see a theme here where EVERYTHING takes an action. While unifying the rules does make things easier to learn, I fear that being TOO reliant on the action mechanics is going to lead to the "one size fits all" problem. I'd really like to see a clause in the Interact Action that allows you to take the action simultaneously with another action, so long as it makes sense.

For instance, grabbing a potion (or bomb for an alchemist) out of your belt pouch with one hand while you open a door with the other.


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I would prefer seeing a regular abbreviation for Failure, Success, etc., such as the Redcap's ability might have:
DC 17, CF/F: frightened 4 (etc), S: frightened 2, CS: no effect

Saving a line or two for every save can add up, especially at higher levels. Even if not reduced to initials/abbreviations, just making it a stat rather than a sentence would be best in the long run.
Thanks.

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