Pathfinder a la Mode

Friday, March 23, 2018

No, we are not putting a scoop of ice cream on top of every copy of the Pathfinder Playtest Rulebook, but we are adding flavor to the different parts of the game. You've probably heard a lot about it in the blogs and podcasts, but today we are dishing out a big scoop of news on the different modes of play in the next evolution of Pathfinder!

Every moment in the game can be categorized into encounter mode, exploration more, or downtime mode. The modes of play are governed by the needs of the adventure, and the transition between them is ultimately up to the Game Master to decide. You might be traveling through the woods, following the trail of the bandit queen, which would be exploration mode, only to have the group thrust into encounter mode as a combat breaks out with a pack of bloodthirsty wolves. Later, after defeating the bandit queen, you might take your treasure back to town and take a week off, entering downtime mode to craft a better suit of armor with your newfound wealth.

Illustration by Wayne Reynolds

Encounter Mode

Without a doubt, this is the most talked about part of the game up to this point. Combat takes place exclusively in encounter mode, when characters, villains, and monsters are locked in a life-or-death struggle, wielding blades, claws, and spells to win the day. As we've mentioned elsewhere, encounter mode functions much like it did in Pathfinder First Edition, with each round of play taking 6 seconds of game time. You roll initiative at the start, putting all of the combatants in order; each one takes a turn in initiative order, and then you cycle through the combatants repeatedly until one side is victorious.

The changes we made to this system are intended to make play a little easier to learn, while also giving you a wider array of choices as to how you can take your turn. To start with, each character gets 3 actions on their turn. While everyone has access to a list of basic actions, like stride (which lets you move your speed), step (which lets you move just 5 feet, but without provoking any reactions), and strike (which lets you make an attack), all characters have special actions that they can take, derived from their ancestry, class, feat, and gear choices.

For example, if you're playing a barbarian, you can take a feat called Raging Courage that allows you to spend actions to shake off being afraid, letting you get back into the fight. If you're playing a fighter, you instead pick a feat called Intimidating Strike, which lets you spend 2 actions to make an attack against a foe. If it hits, your enemy is frightened and flat-footed until the end of your next turn! (Just don't use it on that barbarian.)

In addition to the 3 actions on your turn, you also get 1 reaction to use anytime before the start of your next turn. The fighter blog on Monday mentioned the reaction attack of opportunity, which allows you to take a free swing at foes that try to move around you or attempt to cast spells adjacent to you, but fighters are not the only class to have fun things to do with their reactions. The druid can gain a feat called Storm Retribution. If you are a druid of the storm order and a foe critically hits you, this feat allows you to unleash a powerful tempest on them in return, dealing 3d12 damage and possibly pushing them away. Wizards, meanwhile, can get the ability to counterspell with their reaction, canceling out enemy magic before it can even take effect.

The choices you make when building your character greatly influence what you can do during combat. You can build a simpler character with a narrow field of powerful choices, just as easily as a more complex character with a vast array of options in a fight. As with the other modes of play, it's all up to you!

Exploration Mode

If you are not in a combat, chances are you are in exploration mode. This free-form part of the game allows characters to take actions as needed to accomplish tasks, investigate problems, and interact with other characters and the world around them. Travelling from place to place, talking to a merchant lord, and swimming across a river to a mysterious island are all part of exploration mode. Exploration mode is measured in minutes and hours, depending on the task at hand and the flow of the game.

Skills and skill feats govern a lot of what you can do in this part of the game, along with your roleplaying and character backstory (as related to your background). These options are available to all characters, and while some get more options than others (like rogues), you can always focus on a few ways in which you can shine.

Let's say you really want your sorcerer to be in tune with nature. Not only could you put some of your proficiencies into the Nature skill, giving you knowledge of the natural world, including plants and beasts, but you could take skill feats that let you use Nature to heal people or even train an animal, which can then help you on your journey. These opportunities are not unique to any particular character. Anyone with the right proficiencies can select them.

For long periods of exploration, characters focus on one task at a time so it's easy for the GM to determine what rolls they make and how they're set up for any challenges they face. This lets the game move quickly through long journeys, then resume a more fine-grained pace when the party finds something to investigate or encounters monsters or hazards.

What you do in exploration mode can also influence how you enter combat. As you go on your adventures, the Game Master will periodically ask you what you are doing, how you are traveling, and what precautions you are taking as you venture into the unknown. These choices influence what you roll when it's time to roll initiative. For most characters it will be a Perception check, indicating how alert you were to the danger. If instead you were trying to hide, you might roll Stealth, possibly allowing you to start the combat unseen. If the fight is breaking out in the middle of a crowded tavern, you might roll Diplomacy or Intimidation to get the upper hand, using charm or a brutish manner to give you an edge. The GM makes the final determination of what everyone rolls for initiative, and might allow you to choose between multiple choices (one of which is typically Perception) if several options would make sense.

Downtime Mode

Up to this point, we haven't talked much about the downtime mode of play, where time passes quickly, allowing characters to retrain, work at a profession, craft items, and more. Downtime mode is always measured in days, allowing you to accomplish large tasks quickly in terms of time at the table.

Just as with exploration mode, how you interact during downtime mode is mostly up to you and the choices you make with your character. If you are playing a bard with expert proficiency in Performance, you might spend your downtime putting on shows in local taverns and for nearby nobles, earning money to help fund your next adventure. With a few days and a decent roll, you could easily afford an extra potion or two.

Let's say instead you are playing a dwarven fighter who wants to make his own weapons. With the Craft skill, you can make weapons of a quality up to your proficiency. Better yet, if you pick up the Magical Crafter skill feat, your dwarven fighter could even make magic weapons! This feat is available to anyone who is an expert crafter, making the creation of magic items available to all. I should note that some items, like scrolls and wands, do require you to be able to cast certain spells to create them, though.

Finally, we have made retraining a core part of the game, allowing you to trade out a feat, skill, or even class choice for another equal option. Retraining occurs during downtime, and can take as little as a week, giving you the flexibility to go on your next adventures with the right tools to succeed.

Well, that's the scoop on this blog. I wish I could tell you a bit about the Monday blog, but it succeeded at its Stealth check. You'll just have to stop by then to find out what it is!

Jason Bulmahn
Director of Game Design

More Paizo Blog.
Tags: Pathfinder Playtest Wayne Reynolds
1 to 50 of 353 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | next > last >>

This isn't tagged to show up in the Playtest Forum.


7 people marked this as a favorite.

(Fingers and toes crossed) Really hoping that hint means Monday's blog will be about the rogue.


6 people marked this as a favorite.

Glad to see magic item crafting (sans spell batteries) shift to the role of craftsmen rather than mages.


kyrt-ryder wrote:
Glad to see magic item crafting (sans spell batteries) shift to the role of craftsmen rather than mages.

I mean we don't know that yet because well the last edition you could do that too. It was such a crappy feat.

The Exchange

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Modules Subscriber

I am still nervous about Exploration mode being endlessly gamed by people trying to use their best stat on initiative, but I am oddly soothed by the idea that its usually perception since that means making Dex less of a god stat.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

You raise a valid point. It appears to be all about proficiency with one gateway feat with no regard for spellcasting... But we don't know enough to be certain


Really looking forward to seeing what sorts of utility abilities the class feats, spells, and skill feats will provide.

Paizo Employee Designer

16 people marked this as a favorite.
MadScientistWorking wrote:
kyrt-ryder wrote:
Glad to see magic item crafting (sans spell batteries) shift to the role of craftsmen rather than mages.
I mean we don't know that yet because well the last edition you could do that too. It was such a crappy feat.

The Magical Crafter skill feat is the feat to make magic items. It is the feat for spellcasters. It is the feat for fighters.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Companion, Maps, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Xenocrat wrote:
This isn't tagged to show up in the Playtest Forum.

It's not visible on the Paizo Blog page, either; the WftC Player's Guide post is still the latest listed. (I have been checking that thing all day for this.)


Sounds good. Hopefully the significant skill buffs that appear to be happening should keep skills (as opposed to spells) the primary driver of exploration mode into high levels.


3 people marked this as a favorite.

Oh cool. Rouge blog on Monday? Should be interesting

That said.. there’s just... not a ton here. There’s almost no new information here, and most of the new feats kind of yell TRAP to me. Like... spending a reaction to deal damage to an enemy that’s right next to you... and just crit you?

I guess Handle Animal is wrapped up into Nature now as well? Having multiple skills able to heal now is kind of cool, I guess, but the way it’s presented here is underwhelming.

Shadow Lodge

3 people marked this as a favorite.

I love the three modes of play here. It really highlights different aspects of the game and helps people think about exploration versus combat vs downtime - rather than having them blend into each other.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

I notice the skill is called "Nature" rather than "Knowledge: Nature". Does it still key off of Intelligence or is it wisdom now (and therefore a more appropriate skill for Druids to have)?


3 people marked this as a favorite.

As we learned on the "leveling up" blog, a character gets choices of certain "skill feats"- Are these generally applicable outside of Encounter mode, so choosing to heal with nature or make magic weapons with Craft is not made at the expense of combat acumen? A lot of the problems with non-combat feats in the old game was simply the opportunity cost of taking them instead of feats that help you hurt people or avoid harm.

Ideally people will have fun stuff to do in all modes, I would figure.


kyrt-ryder wrote:
Glad to see magic item crafting (sans spell batteries) shift to the role of craftsmen rather than mages.

True. It was both a bit silly and unfair... (STR 8 robed fellow hammering down on a big sword, really?)


25 people marked this as a favorite.

This article is very light on specifics. It more or less describes how any edition of D&D plays out at the table. There's not much here explaining what makes PF2's "modes" different or cool, and what little there is is somewhat vague and not well articulated. Hopefully as they reveal more information it will all start to make sense.

Also, does anyone else dislike the use of the word "mode"? You could remove it entirely and just refer to "encounters", "exploration" and "downtime". A semantic quibble, sure, but 4E showed us that these things matter. How much of the hatred directed toward "skill challenges" and "encounter powers" is derived from the way their names explicitly draw attention to the gamist aspects of their design?

Silver Crusade

5 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Bardic Dave wrote:
A semantic quibble

Of course, you're fine with a level 14 Wizard on the 4th level of the dungeon casting a 4th level spell despite having 4 negative levels from energy drain. :)


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Arachnofiend wrote:
I notice the skill is called "Nature" rather than "Knowledge: Nature". Does it still key off of Intelligence or is it wisdom now (and therefore a more appropriate skill for Druids to have)?

Maybe Nature's still Intelligence-based for everyone else, but the wild empathy ability now also allows classes with it (wild empathy) to use it (the Nature skill) with Wisdom instead?


2 people marked this as a favorite.

Question:

Since Skill Checks appear to be an action and attacks appear to be an action, what's the benefit of Intimidating Strike vs Attack + Intimidate?


3 people marked this as a favorite.

I figure "Mode" is mostly used when laying out the rules text. Certain things will likely work differently in Exploration mode versus Encounter mode, and "In Encounter mode, do X" is probably more natural to write than "when Encountering" or "When in combat".

Now you can subdivide the rules chapter into three places, but in practice people will probably just say "we're exploring" or "during downtime I..." etc.

Edna Mode wrote:
Maybe Nature's still Intelligence-based for everyone else, but the wild empathy ability now also allows classes with it (wild empathy) to use it (the Nature skill) with Wisdom instead?

Need skills be restricted to be used with a single attribute? I can see uses of Athletics that rely on one's strength, and other uses of Athletics that rely on one's constitution, so perhaps Nature is Int-based for things like "identifying plants" but Wis or Cha based for other things.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

Ooh, Druid orders. I hope we get plenty of those, with interesting class feats to take. I'm hoping for swarm/rot/fungus stuff.

I'm glad that my Sorcerer will still have a route to get a pet wolf! Bit more investment than before, but having separate ancestry feats will help.

Crafting sounds cool, and like a good nicely min-maxy option to get bonuses in other skills. And, with the proficiency system, kitting yourself out with home-made tools doesn't supersede other characters' investments. Anybody being able to craft magic items is pretty nice, too.

Hmm. I wonder if there will be benefits to having somebody perform in your camp site, even without a feat?


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Gorbacz wrote:
Bardic Dave wrote:
A semantic quibble
Of course, you're fine with a level 14 Wizard on the 4th level of the dungeon casting a 4th level spell despite having 4 negative levels from energy drain. :)

Don't put words in my mouth you toothy old bag! I can't help but wonder if there's a troll lurking at bottom of that bag of devouring...

As for "level", I'd love to see that sacred cow die, but that ship sailed ages ago.

Also, your critique wasn't very on point. I'm not complaining about whether or not Paizo is consistent or clear in their naming. Au contraire, the word "mode" makes the implications for gameplay very clear, and I do appreciate that aspect of its use. What I object to is the feel it evokes, which of course is a subjective critique; I do think there's a decent percentage of the D&D/Pathfinder fanbase that feel similarly, which was my point about 4E and "encounter powers".


Mark Seifter wrote:
MadScientistWorking wrote:
kyrt-ryder wrote:
Glad to see magic item crafting (sans spell batteries) shift to the role of craftsmen rather than mages.
I mean we don't know that yet because well the last edition you could do that too. It was such a crappy feat.
The Magical Crafter skill feat is the feat to make magic items. It is the feat for spellcasters. It is the feat for fighters.

You will need to take Magical Crafter for each type of magic item?

I really hope crafting has been seriously reworked so it doesn't take weeks or months to craft a high level magic item.


4 people marked this as a favorite.
The Blog wrote:
The druid can gain a feat called Storm Retribution. If you are a druid of the storm order and a foe critically hits you, this feat allows you to unleash a powerful tempest on them in return, dealing 3d12 damage and possibly pushing them away

I get it. I played a lot of 4th ed. I am more prone than anyone else to spot the similarities between Pathfinder 2nd edition and D&D 4th ed. however this is exactly the sort of "build" and "class" style I would expect from 4th ed.

We've got at-will powers, we've got dailies (spells) and we've got utility powers (skill feats). All we're missing are some encounter powers (can only be used once per mode and require a mode change to refresh?) and we'll have AEDU return (although with some classes locked out of daily powers).

As for the meat of the content of the blog post: Eh. It's good to get some advice on how to handle out of combat situations. Although I hope we don't see the return of skill challenges. And I also hope it's easy enough to hand-waive away and focus on exploring the world (as in we focus more on what's happening in-character) rather than playing the game (focusing on what abilities we have to get the most advantage out of the current non-combat encounter).


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Bardic Dave wrote:

This article is very light on specifics. It more or less describes how any edition of D&D plays out at the table. There's not much here explaining what makes PF2's "modes" different or cool, and what little there is is somewhat vague and not well articulated. Hopefully as they reveal more information it will all start to make sense.

I don't think it is different from the 1st edition or how 3rd Ed. D&D has been played at all. But it has never been defined as explicitly as this before.

And this categorization can now be used for prerequisites. Maybe the Sorcerer can use the nature to heal, but only during exploration, not in combat. That way, it is clearer how such ability is meant to be used than when the rule says it takes a minute to do that and therefore can be done in combat but only with a relatively high amount of time.


3 people marked this as a favorite.
Gorbacz wrote:
Bardic Dave wrote:
A semantic quibble
Of course, you're fine with a level 14 Wizard on the 4th level of the dungeon casting a 4th level spell despite having 4 negative levels from energy drain. :)

That's a level 14 wizard on the 4th Floor casting a 4th CIRCLE spell, thank you ;3


Bends down to drink information from blog post, tide recedes again

As has been the case with pretty much every one of these blog posts so far, my only real complaint is that it isn't longer and more detailed.

I like that everybody will have reactions themed to who/what they are. I really like that counterspelling is a reaction by default. I would like to know more.

Blog Post wrote:
Not only could you put some of your proficiencies into the Nature skill, giving you knowledge of the natural world, including plants and beasts, but you could take skill feats that let you use Nature to heal people or even train an animal, which can then help you on your journey. These opportunities are not unique to any particular character. Anyone with the right proficiencies can select them.

I can't tell if this means that animal companions are essentially open to anyone, rather than being only an intrinsic function of some classes or if this is referring to a version of the original animal handling rules for rearing and training animals. I think it would be interesting if it were the former, with classes that allow/rely on animal companions being granted a head start by their class features. I would like to know more.

I like that you can make your character as narrow or broad as you want in terms of what actions you can take. It makes me wonder how frequently bonus actions/reactions can be acquired, though. We already saw that fighters can get bonus reactions for use with their shields. I wonder how easy these sorts of things are to come by. I would like to know more.

Paizo Employee Director of Game Design

24 people marked this as a favorite.

Use of the word mode just lets us have sentences that make sense. When in the middle of running text we might say, "while exploring", but we also like having the ability to say "During encounter mode, you can..." . Its not really worth delving into on this thread (and seriously.. I do not want to derail things), but we are trying to take a little bit of a lighter hand with hard-coded grammar constructions for our rules so that the text is a bit easier to read and parse.


I guess skills are going to be a lot less granular than I thought / hoped. I thought maybe Heal would still be its own thing, Handle Animal would get merged with Ride, and Knowledge: Nature / Geography / Dungeoneering would be merged with Survival... But it kinda sounds like those are all one skill.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

Ooh, I just realized that something like "making effects span an entire mode" would be able to make a more functional Spirit Dancer Medium-

One could channel the trickster during Exploration mode because you're attending a party, and not run out of your channeling ability because it's now measured in modes and not minutes.

I always liked the idea of that archetype, but practically it was hard to use for campaigns with a roughly 50:50 fancy parties to dungeons ratio.

Paizo Employee Designer

20 people marked this as a favorite.
John Lynch 106 wrote:
I also hope it's easy enough to hand-waive away and focus on exploring the world (as in we focus more on what's happening in-character) rather than playing the game (focusing on what abilities we have to get the most advantage out of the current non-combat encounter).

One of the biggest points of separating the modes is to allow exploration mode in particular to explicitly be about exploring the world and not a round-by-round accounting of every action people take.


edduardco wrote:
Mark Seifter wrote:
MadScientistWorking wrote:
kyrt-ryder wrote:
Glad to see magic item crafting (sans spell batteries) shift to the role of craftsmen rather than mages.
I mean we don't know that yet because well the last edition you could do that too. It was such a crappy feat.
The Magical Crafter skill feat is the feat to make magic items. It is the feat for spellcasters. It is the feat for fighters.

You will need to take Magical Crafter for each type of magic item?

I really hope crafting has been seriously reworked so it doesn't take weeks or months to craft a high level magic item.

I hope for the opposite, though it'd be easy to houserule. High-level magic items are, by all accounts, going to be much more powerful as befits their stature. These things should be forged over time and great labors. The One Ring shouldn't be forged in a single night.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Dαedαlus wrote:
Oh cool. Rogue blog on Monday? Should be interesting

I see someone made their Perception check. I kind of blew it myself. ^^;; Snuck right past me.

Shadow Lodge Contributor, RPG Superstar 2010 Top 8

Who’s the halfling? Have we seen that character before?


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Jason Bulmahn wrote:
Use of the word mode just lets of have sentences that make sense. When in the middle of running text we might say, "while exploring", but we also like having the ability to say "During encounter mode, you can..." . Its not really worth delving into on this thread (and seriously.. I do not want to derail things), but we are trying to take a little bit of a lighter hand with hard-coded grammar constructions for our rules so that the text is a bit easier to read and parse.

I can't speak for anyone else, but as a longtime veteran (and former player and writer) of various White Wolf/Onyx Path games...

This is greatly appreciated.

So very, very appreciated. "Your swords become like things unto chainsaws" indeed. There's nothing wrong with having simplified language when it comes to rules. I hope that extends to abilities, where the rules and flavor of the ability are discrete.


Know:Nature/ Handle Animal being combined makes sense to me.
Although that reminds how Ride / Handle Animal "borders" seem confused,
Ride really seems like it's mostly about Rider's own dextrous talent,
but then also covers things like "Guide with Knees" / "Control Mount in Battle"
which HUGELY overlap with Handle Animal, consider HA is used to direct animals to move...
Enabling use of HA to move animal "on it's turn, not yours" evading penalties for archery "while" mount is moving full speed.
Bringing all mount control under Handle Animal house (shared with Nature, using WIS?) makes sense.

Dark Archive

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Roleplaying Game Subscriber; Pathfinder Comics Subscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber
thflame wrote:

Question:

Since Skill Checks appear to be an action and attacks appear to be an action, what's the benefit of Intimidating Strike vs Attack + Intimidate?

From the sound of it, you don't need intimidate to do it - if you hit, then you do damage and you frighten &. Flat foot them. It's also likely that the basic intimidate does less than that - the PF1 base version only goes to shaken for example.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Jason Bulmahn wrote:
Use of the word mode just lets of have sentences that make sense. When in the middle of running text we might say, "while exploring", but we also like having the ability to say "During encounter mode, you can..." . Its not really worth delving into on this thread (and seriously.. I do not want to derail things), but we are trying to take a little bit of a lighter hand with hard-coded grammar constructions for our rules so that the text is a bit easier to read and parse.

Yes, I agree. I do, however, think this advantage needs to be carefully weighed against the meta, gamey feel the word "mode" evokes. I could probably get used to it, but I'd prefer to not be explicitly referring to different modes of play at the table. It seems a little intrusive. Now, out of respect for your desire to not hijack the thread, that's my last word on the subject!


However, I do really like confirmation of Counterspell as a reaction. I may be mollified on AoOs a bit if every class gets good things for their reactions that aren't too situational; if they never come up, then eh...

I personally think getting to roll different skills depending on the situation for initiative is a good call and helps tone down Dex as the one stat to rule them all; I can definitely see a rabble rouser who is using Bluff to rile a mob with lies using his Bluff for initiative once violence breaks out!

Nice to see stuff like the mentioned fighter and barbarian feats. However, the barbarian one feels really weak unless it can deal with effects besides just fear.


Lady Firebird wrote:
edduardco wrote:
Mark Seifter wrote:
MadScientistWorking wrote:
kyrt-ryder wrote:
Glad to see magic item crafting (sans spell batteries) shift to the role of craftsmen rather than mages.
I mean we don't know that yet because well the last edition you could do that too. It was such a crappy feat.
The Magical Crafter skill feat is the feat to make magic items. It is the feat for spellcasters. It is the feat for fighters.

You will need to take Magical Crafter for each type of magic item?

I really hope crafting has been seriously reworked so it doesn't take weeks or months to craft a high level magic item.

I hope for the opposite, though it'd be easy to houserule. High-level magic items are, by all accounts, going to be much more powerful as befits their stature. These things should be forged over time and great labors. The One Ring shouldn't be forged in a single night.

I know it makes sense thematically, but so many campaigns just doesn't have that luxury. Also, between crafting your own gear or going to a magic shop I know I prefer crafting, just a personal preference.


3 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Card Game, Class Deck, Maps, Roleplaying Game, Tales Subscriber; Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Pathfinder Deluxe Comics Subscriber; Pathfinder Legends Subscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber
Jason Bulmahn wrote:
Use of the word mode just lets of have sentences that make sense. When in the middle of running text we might say, "while exploring", but we also like having the ability to say "During encounter mode, you can..." . Its not really worth delving into on this thread (and seriously.. I do not want to derail things), but we are trying to take a little bit of a lighter hand with hard-coded grammar constructions for our rules so that the text is a bit easier to read and parse.

I’ve been a smidge worried PF2 is going to read either like a law book or a computer manual.

Games which aren’t written in plain English always sit on my shelf. No matter how cunning the game design, if the rules don’t make me read them, I’m never going to play it.


Gorbacz wrote:
Bardic Dave wrote:
A semantic quibble
Of course, you're fine with a level 14 Wizard on the 4th level of the dungeon casting a 4th level spell despite having 4 negative levels from energy drain. :)

I hate stuff like that. Although perhaps P2E Spell DC paradigm means they would all be DC/CL of lower level spellcaster?

Actually, if I heard correctly that Ability Drain is gone, there will be no Ability Drain stopping you from using Stat Pre-Req abilities (Feats or min Stat for Spell level)? Not sure I like that, wasn't hard to implement and seemed like most intuitive outcome. "Wow, this really affected me, I'm not strong/magicked enough to do X anymore!" I like idea of having to drop heavy carried items if STR drained, of not using Combat Reflexes, etc. Otherwise you don't really care about removing the condition, as long as you could receive some buff to whatever rolls are affected, even though that buff doesn't claim to actually make your STR etc, it could be "Luck" or whatever.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Dαedαlus wrote:
That said.. there’s just... not a ton here. There’s almost no new information here, and most of the new feats kind of yell TRAP to me. Like... spending a reaction to deal damage to an enemy that’s right next to you... and just crit you?

I don't think that's much of a trap. Melee enemies are more problematic for casters, depending on their reactions. Until you have something to spend a reaction on, they're not worth anything. It's limited to crits because otherwise it's just "get a free +2 warhammer attack every turn". Added bonus, you have a chance to shove them back, which is either very good for your action economy or very bad for theirs.


I love the mention of counter spelling and non caster, magic item crafting

Dark Archive

4 people marked this as a favorite.
Lady Firebird wrote:
edduardco wrote:
Mark Seifter wrote:
MadScientistWorking wrote:
kyrt-ryder wrote:
Glad to see magic item crafting (sans spell batteries) shift to the role of craftsmen rather than mages.
I mean we don't know that yet because well the last edition you could do that too. It was such a crappy feat.
The Magical Crafter skill feat is the feat to make magic items. It is the feat for spellcasters. It is the feat for fighters.

You will need to take Magical Crafter for each type of magic item?

I really hope crafting has been seriously reworked so it doesn't take weeks or months to craft a high level magic item.

I hope for the opposite, though it'd be easy to houserule. High-level magic items are, by all accounts, going to be much more powerful as befits their stature. These things should be forged over time and great labors. The One Ring shouldn't be forged in a single night.

This, entirely.

I hope crafting the better, higher end items take a lot of time and investment, potentially some quests to gain the right items. Give them flavor, history, meaning.. and a story. Definitely not just ok, I spend 1 day of downtime to create my +4 Sword of Demonslaying. Where's the excitement behind that? Not just having it but telling people how you came to have it.

Though I do hope, and it sounds likely, that you need the appropriate craft skill at the appropriate level and just the one feat across them. I don't want to have to take a feat for Armor and a feat for Weapons and another feat for Rings..


1 person marked this as a favorite.
edduardco wrote:
Mark Seifter wrote:
MadScientistWorking wrote:
kyrt-ryder wrote:
Glad to see magic item crafting (sans spell batteries) shift to the role of craftsmen rather than mages.
I mean we don't know that yet because well the last edition you could do that too. It was such a crappy feat.
The Magical Crafter skill feat is the feat to make magic items. It is the feat for spellcasters. It is the feat for fighters.

You will need to take Magical Crafter for each type of magic item?

I really hope crafting has been seriously reworked so it doesn't take weeks or months to craft a high level magic item.

Given the wording in both the blog post and Mark's reply, I'm actually under the impression that you can make any magic items with the feat as a one-and-done deal, assuming you meet other prerequisites for crafting.

If this is the approach Paizo's going for, it just makes me wonder if Spellcraft is still going to be a skill...


1 person marked this as a favorite.
QuidEst wrote:
Dαedαlus wrote:
Most of the new feats kind of yell TRAP to me. Like... spending a reaction to deal damage to an enemy that’s right next to you... and just crit you?
I don't think that's much of a trap. Melee enemies are more problematic for casters, depending on their reactions. Until you have something to spend a reaction on, they're not worth anything. It's limited to crits because otherwise it's just "get a free +2 warhammer attack every turn". Added bonus, you have a chance to shove them back, which is either very good for your action economy or very bad for theirs.

I think that's people not yet taking on board impact of generalized healing options AND DR shield/armor options, where Crits are really what gets you... And P2E 10+ Crit design means unlike 3.x/P1E where monsters generally aren't Crit-optimized, Crits will at least at basic level be one and same with basic combat ability. Interrupting a potential 2nd or 3rd attack is even bigger a deal when they already Crit you.

1 to 50 of 353 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | next > last >>
Community / Forums / Pathfinder / Pathfinder Playtest / Paizo Blog: Pathfinder a la Mode All Messageboards